cinchona

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cinchona

 [sin-ko´nah]
the dried bark of the stem or root of various South American trees of the genus Cinchona; it is the source of quinine, cinchonine, and other alkaloids and was used as an antimalarial.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cin·cho·na

(sin-kō'nă),
The dried bark of the root and stem of various species of Cinchona, a genus of evergreen trees (family Rubiaceae), native of South America but cultivated in various tropic regions. The cultivated bark contains 7-10% of total alkaloids; about 70% is quinine. Cinchona contains more than 20 alkaloids, of which two pairs of isomers are most important: quinine and quinidine, and cinchonidine and cinchonine.
[Cinchona, fr. Countess of Chinch'on]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cinchona

(sĭng-kō′nə, sĭn-chō′-)
n.
1. Any of various evergreen trees and shrubs of the genus Cinchona, native chiefly to the Andes, some species of which are cultivated for their bark, which contains quinine and other alkaloids used chiefly to treat malaria.
2. The dried bark of any of these plants. Also called Jesuit's bark, Peruvian bark.

cin·chon′ic (sĭng-kŏn′ĭk, sĭn-chŏn′-) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cinchona

Herbal medicine
A tree native to South America, the primary source of the alkaloids, quinine and quinidine, which was the first effective antimalarial agent; other alkaloids present in cinchona include cinchonidine and cinchonine.
 
Toxicity
Abdominal pain, deafness, delirium, headache, impaired vision, nausea, psychotic disorder, tinnitus, vomiting and weakness.

Homeopathy
See China.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

cin·cho·na

(sin-kō'nă)
The dried bark of the root and stem of various species of Cinchona, a genus of evergreen trees contains more than 20 alkaloids, of which two pairs of isomers are most important: quinine and quinidine, and cinchonidine and cinchonine.
[Cinchona, fr. Countess of Chinch'on]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cinchona

A south American tree, genus Cinchona , from the bark of which quinine is derived.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005