Jerusalem syndrome


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Related to Jerusalem syndrome: Stendhal syndrome
A psychosomatic response—tachycardia, vertigo, fainting, confusion and even hallucinations—when the ‘victim’ is exposed to particularly beautiful, or large amounts of, art in a single place—e.g., Florence (Italy), which has a high concentration of classic works; the response can also occur when a person is overwhelmed by breathtaking natural beauty

Jerusalem syndrome

(jĕ-roo′să-lĕm)
A temporary or permanent delusional disorder following a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, characterized by extreme religious preoccupations or the belief that the pilgrim has become the embodiment or incarnation of an important biblical character.
References in periodicals archive ?
In regard to his book on the Jerusalem Syndrome, such desperate detachment might prove valuable.
Jerusalem syndrome describes people found wandering the city with fantasies of participating in wondrous events.
As if outside of time, the personal merges with the archetypal, internal with external, in what is called the Jerusalem Syndrome.
Like those caught up in the Jerusalem syndrome, there is an increased danger for the individual to identify with those greater forces, leading to a sense of personal inflation.
Such fancies persist, extremity of vision being the commonplace of the Jerusalem Syndrome project.
Those afflicted with Jerusalem syndrome fall into two categories: Eighty-two percent are people with previous pshychological disorders; the more perplexing remainder with no history of problems exhibit what psychiatrists call the "syndrome proper.
on March 28, 2010, the S= impsons find themselves in Israel, and Homer develops Jerusalem Syndrome an= d becomes convinced that he is the messiah.
The Jerusalem Syndrome strikes with little warning: After a few days in the holy city, seemingly normal pilgrims imagine they are biblical figures, sing psalms at the top of their lungs, preach to passers-by or dress up in hotel bedsheets.
Heinz Herman, the father of Israeli psychiatry, but was only labeled as the Jerusalem Syndrome in the last two decades.
It is fear of potential violent attacks, endangering the public as well as the patient himself, that causes Israeli doctors to treat sufferers of the Jerusalem Syndrome with extreme caution.
In 1982, Bar-El identified a disorder that afflicts a minority of pilgrims to the Holy City and called it the Jerusalem Syndrome.