Kampo

(redirected from Japanese traditional medicine)

Kampo

(kŏm′pō′) [Japanese, Chinese medicine]
Traditional Japanese medicine, a healing discipline adapted from ancient Chinese healing traditions. It includes the use of acupuncture, herbal remedies, and moxibustion, among others.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Further modifications of Japanese traditional medicine occurred during the Edo period (1603-1867) [7, 8].
Along with platelet infusion every other day due to suppressed hematopoiesis, his gross hematuria and clot retention in the bladder were successfully treated with chor-eito, a formula from Japanese traditional medicine (Kampo medicine).
Choreito is a formula from Japanese traditional medicine, Kampo medicine.
Hochuekkito has been used to treat elderly patients with general weakness in Chinese and Japanese traditional medicine. However, to date, no strong scientific evidence is available to support the use of Hochuekkito in these patients.
Keishi-bukuryo-gan (Gui-Zhi-Fu-Ling-Wan) (KBG) is one of the prescriptions in Japanese traditional medicine for improving the "oketsu" syndrome, so-called blood stasis syndrome.
"Oketsu", blood stasis syndrome, is one of the pathological concepts unique to Japanese traditional medicine. In Japanese traditional medicine, "ketsu" ("Xue" or blood), means human red body fluid containing life energy ("ki" or "Qi"), that circulates in the body.
Keishi-bukuryo-gan (KBG: Gui-Zhi-Fu-Ling-Wan), one of the prescriptions in Japanese traditional medicine for improving the "oketsu" syndrome, exerts some favorable pharmacological effects on improving a conjunctival microcirculation (Itoh et al., 1988), inhibiting a platelet aggregation, suppressing the production of Thromboxane A2 in platelets, and decreasing blood viscosity (Tosa et al., 1987) and RBC aggregability (Kohta et al., 1993).
The "oketsu" score was determined by two of the authors, both specialists in Japanese traditional medicine. "Oketsu" score, RBC deformability, and intracellular ATP content were measured at 0 (immediately before administration) and 4 weeks after administration.
This prescription is one of the most popular prescriptions for improving the "oketsu" syndrome in Japanese traditional medicine, and has the effect of improving hemorheological parameters such as blood viscosity and RBC aggregability.
Yamamoto et al., "Effects of Japanese traditional medicines on circulating cytokine levels in women with hot flashes," Menopause, vol.

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