Japanese honeysuckle


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Japanese honeysuckle

Chinese medicine
A shrub, the stems, leaves and flowers of which are anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, diuretic and believed to purify the blood; it is used for abscesses, allergies, haemorrhoids, obesity, infection, internal haemorrhage and sore throat.
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Japanese honeysuckle was recognized as a significant threat to forests of eastern Texas by the Texas Invasive Plant and Pest Council (www.texasinvasives.org/ invasives), Texas Forestry Association (http://www.
Mulberry leaf, Japanese honeysuckle and goldthread were purchased from Kyung-dong herbal market (Seoul, Korea).
(EE)-[alpha]-farnesene was found in the floral odor of Japanese honeysuckle (Schlotzhauer et al.
Since becoming naturalized in North America, Japanese honeysuckle has also been planted for wildlife, primarily as forage.
This is our native honeysuckle, but it is not invasive, like Japanese Honeysuckle. It has red, tubular flowers.
You don't have to import non-native species whose appropriateness in this bio-region might be questionable; perhaps the exotic plants won't thrive in our moist climate or perhaps they will thrive too well and invade upon natural habitat spaces, as was the case with Asian bittersweet, Japanese honeysuckle, Chinese wisteria, English ivy, and (need I mention it?) Kudzu.
An old favourite, the evergreen Japanese honeysuckle, Lonicera japonica , grew longer, sending out snaky tendrils to embrace trellis and surmount wall while finding the energy to open pale yellow, scented blooms for months on end.
An old favourite, the evergreen Japanese honeysuckle, Lonicera japonica, grew longer, sending out snaky tendrils to embrace trellis and surmount wall while finding the energy to open pale yellow, scented blooms for months on end.
Management for invasive species such as Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica), wintercreeper (Euonymus fortunei), garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata), and Amur honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii) is critical in both lawn and woodland sites.
Japanese honeysuckle is probably the most easy-going of climbers.
Robert Taylor, district silviculturist at Conecuh National Forest, also dreams of future populations of plants and animals now rarely seen in his Alabama forest: Japanese honeysuckle and native jasmine, gopher tortoises,endangered Indiana gray bats, the red-cockaded woodpeckers.
Golden mice nest most frequently in Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica, hereafter referred to as honeysuckle) and/or Eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana, hereafter referred to as juniper) - two species that annually produce an abundance of seeds in close proximity ([less than]1 m) to nest sites (Barbour, 1942; Handley, 1948; Goodpaster and Hoffmeister, 1954; Linzey, 1968; Linzey and Packard, 1977; Knuth and Barrett, 1984).

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