Zen

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Zen

A form of meditation that emphasizes direct experience.
Mentioned in: Pilates
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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While Chan retained a strong sense of connection to Chinese culture as it became Japanese Zen, the Zen that emerged in the West was both a by-product of pluralistic currents moving through the world in the nineteenth century and of cultural changes to Zen, especially in its exoteric aspects, as Zen accommodated itself to Western cultures.
Among the topics are perception-action cycles in the remote control of helicopters, linguistic constraints on interpersonal coordination and communication, gaze control and brain development in infants from four to twelve months old, aesthetics and environmental enclosures in Japanese Zen gardens, and the recurrence analysis of interjoint coordination in children during volleyball practice task constraints.
Zen's intentionality can predestine the topological features of peninsular Korean Son, which is different from the continental Chinese Ch'an or the insular Japanese Zen.
This book is a departure for Heine, a scholar known for his pioneering work on medieval Japanese Zen thought (especially Dogen) and Zen practice (the koan).
10 SANTA FE Ten Thousand Waves has been a Japanese Zen fixture here for decades, with serene teak, tile, and ceramic tubs.
As an alternative lens through which to read these late plays, Japanese Zen Buddhism also suggests the limits of subjectivity and discursive thought but offers a far more concrete paradigm for contextualizing these plays within a tradition of mental and physical practice.
She discovered the Japanese Zen aesthetics and rituals of the Sufi whirling in the late seventies.
This is a sophisticated and thought-provoking reflection on Japanese Buddhist ethics and Zen militarism, but those readers looking for a detailed social history of Japanese Zen during the Fifteen-Year War will be disappointed.
Constructed using English yew, what makes it unique is that it contains themed gardens, including an idyll of 200 roses, a Japanese Zen garden and a tropical and butterfly garden too.
It's a slightly curious move, but-- perhaps the contemplation of a controlled landscape, akin to a Japanese Zen garden, tranquilises the senses and assists with devotions.
He examines the nature of Zen (with special reference to Japanese Zen), the relation of Zen to management, and possible points of insertion of Zen into the management curriculum.

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