lacquer

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lacquer

(lak′ĕr) [Portuguese lacre, ult. fr Persian lâk, (tree) resin, lac]
A resin or varnish that leaves a tough coating on a surface. It may be impregnated with medication, e.g., in the treatment of diseases of the toenails or fingernails.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Sold by Philippe Rouillac at the Chateau de Cheverny, it represents a peak not just of Japanese lacquer workmanship, but also of the contemporary market for lacquer.
A fine bureau, ornately decorated, ormolu-mounted satine, oeil de vermeil and kingwood parquetry, by Millet sold for [pounds sterling]49,250, an ormolu-mounted maple, mahogany, citronnier and fruitwood marquetry breakfront commode sold for [pounds sterling]43,250 and rare ebony and ebonised Japanese lacquer bureau sold for [pounds sterling]39,650.
The final transparent layer is an acrylic medium, like a Japanese lacquer, which Yvonne has taken years to perfect.
However, Kagedo's main focus was to introduce contemporary Japanese lacquer artwork, and it succeeded in selling several lacquer pieces.
But my eye was taken by the Japanese lacquer games box.
The fair's events series also includes an exhibition of Chinese paintings and Japanese lacquer.
Among the Faberge items, the diamonds, the glass and the Russian silver (what taste Mr Shapiro has!) was a stunning 19th century Japanese lacquer writing case.
Canepa took the sensible decision to divide the book firstly by material: Chinese silk, followed by Chinese porcelain, and lastly Japanese lacquer. Within these divisions she has approached each material geographically and chronologically in terms of traders and destinations--Portugal, Spain, the Northern Netherlands/Dutch Republic, England, and the colonies of the New World.
These bas reliefs vie at the top of my own list of favourites with a little 19th-century Japanese lacquer writing box, its lid showing two screens and a clothes rack.
Some confusion was inevitable and its not unusual to find classical Chinese bronze shapes decorated in the style of Japanese lacquer or 17th century blanc-de-chine Chinese figure groups brightly painted in the manner of Japanese ceramics.
Among the latter is a Japanese lacquer plaque by 'Sasaya' (active c.
A pre-requisite for understanding Japanese lacquer is some knowledge of the extraordinary processes which contribute to its magical appearance.

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