James

(redirected from James VI)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to James VI: Charles I

James

(jāmz),
George C.W., U.S. radiologist, 1915-1972. See: Swyer-James syndrome, Swyer-James-MacLeod syndrome.

James

(jāmz),
Thomas N., 20th-century U.S. cardiologist and physiologist. See: James fibers, James tracts.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Van Heijnsbergen further explores the role of Seneca and stoicism in Scottish literature and its influence on the court of James VI. Wingfield, Emily (2013) The Trojan Legend in Medieval Scottish Literature, Martlesham: Boydell & Brewer.
The third chapter, "Malcolm in the Middle: James VI and I, George Buchanan and the Divine Right of Kings," switches the focus from Anglo-Irish to Anglo-Scottish relations.
Scotland only becomes of interest to English critics once James VI becomes James I.
The measure of James VI's success as an ecclesiastical peacemaker may be taken most easily here, where the young Scottish king managed to preside over a kirk governed by episcopate and presbytery, and where the Catholic faction was subdued by a slow, patient co-optation.
He had been King James VI of Scotland for 36 years before he succeeded his cousin Elizabeth in 1603 as king of England too, as James I.
James VI of Scotland would seem to be the perfect subject for Willis' study.
However, it creditably attempts to make the reign of James VI and I accessible to a wider popular audience, and the extraordinary personal story it tells undoubtedly constitutes a good read.
In 1603 James VI of Scotland became James 1st King of England (including Wales).
On the other hand the Venetian Paulo Sarpi (1552-1623) and Scottish king James VI and I (1566-1625), both active political agents in the affairs of their own states, observed closely the conflicts in France and the Low Countries, the outbreak of the Thirty Years' War, and the culmination of long-term unresolved polico-religious issues.
She was succeeded by James I, who had already been James VI of Scotland for 35 years.
The book traces the foundations of public religious disputation in post-Reformation England, from the accession of Elizabeth I, through to its peak during the reign of James VI & I, to its eventual decline in the 1620s.
But leading historian Dr Clare Jackson says politicians on both sides of the Scottish independence debate could learn from King James VI of Scotland.