James

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Related to James VI: Charles I

James

(jāmz),
George C.W., U.S. radiologist, 1915-1972. See: Swyer-James syndrome, Swyer-James-MacLeod syndrome.

James

(jāmz),
Thomas N., 20th-century U.S. cardiologist and physiologist. See: James fibers, James tracts.
References in periodicals archive ?
The eighth chapter, "Spenser and the Stuart Succession," reads The Faerie Queene in the context of Spenser's apparent hostility to James VI of Scotland's claims to the English throne.
As it is, James VI and I and the Reunion of Christendom is a long-overdue corrective to claustrophobic narratives of English (or even "British") histories of the early Stuarts, and to older works that treat King James as a drooling dolt.
Scottish literary historians, as well as lexicographers, should show more interest in John Burel, a bourgeois 'maker of poyessie' who complicates the received image of Scottish literary life during the reign of James VI.
James VI was very lenient with the conspirators, yet by this time George had already evicted Alexander from the manse.
Predecessor: James V of Scotland Successor: James VI Regent: James Hamilton, 2nd Earl of Arran and Mary of Guise Queen Consort of France: July 10 1559 - December 5 1560 Spouse: Francis II of France (1558-1560); Henry Stuart Lord Darnley (1565-1567); James Hepburn 4th Earl of Bothwell (1567-1578).
When James VI of Scotland travelled south to London to claim the English throne he stopped off for a night in a house adjacent to Durham Cathedral.
The Making of the Jacobean Regime: James VI and I and the Government of England, 1603-1605.
But remember, remember that James I of England was also James VI of Scotland.
More than 3, 500 Scots, mainly women, were executed under the rule of King James VI.
A civil war did not "break open in 1625," the year King James I (also James VI of Scotland) died.
Legend has it that James VI of Scotland, who in 1603, when passing through Hexham on his way south to claim his crown as James I of England, was so impressed by the area that he declared it "truly the Heart of All England".