James

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Related to James IV: James VI

James

(jāmz),
George C.W., U.S. radiologist, 1915-1972. See: Swyer-James syndrome, Swyer-James-MacLeod syndrome.

James

(jāmz),
Thomas N., 20th-century U.S. cardiologist and physiologist. See: James fibers, James tracts.
References in periodicals archive ?
James IV's loss was attributed to the weather and the supernatural, among other things, but history claims human agency as the likely reason.
And each time the piper plays Flowers of the Forest at a grave-side, every Scottish funeral becomes that of James IV.
A Royal Patent granted by James IV to the Chepman and Myllar partnership in 1507 stipulated that the pair will 'furnis and bring hame ane prent [press], with all the stuff belangand therto, and expert men to use the samyne'.
Cavanagh's true test case for his realignment of the history-play idea is Robert Greene's Scottish History of James IV. Greene's play is usually not considered to be a history play, since it has little other than its title of the actually "historical" in it.
* Dallas Cowboys star running back EMMITT SMITH and his wife, PATRICIA, are the proud parents of baby boy EMMITT JAMES IV, who was born in May on his father's 33rd birthday.
When John Ford wrote his Chronicle History of Perkin Warbeck (1634), he included as one of the leading characters the Scottish king, James IV, who had featured as the nominal hero of Robert Greene's much earlier play The Scottish History of James the Fourth (1598).
After the Battle of Flodden (1513), in which James IV of Scotland was killed, Douglas abandoned his literary career for political activities.
When Queen Elizabeth I died in 1603, she was peacefully succeeded by her cousin, King James IV of Scotland, a Stuart, who became King James I of England.
For a time Dunbar was a Franciscan friar and later a diplomatic agent for James IV of Scotland.
Robert Spittal, master tailor to the court of James IV including to James' wife Mary Tudor, is thought to have been responsible for the building of a bridge in the 16th century as well as a number of other bridges around Stirling.
Princess Margaret, the 13-year-old daughter of Henry VII, and sister of Henry VIII, was on her way North to marry James IV of Scotland.