James

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James

(jāmz),
George C.W., U.S. radiologist, 1915-1972. See: Swyer-James syndrome, Swyer-James-MacLeod syndrome.

James

(jāmz),
Thomas N., 20th-century U.S. cardiologist and physiologist. See: James fibers, James tracts.
References in periodicals archive ?
When James II was succeeded by William of Orange, the troubles came to an end.
There are more Shakespearean echoes in "James II: Days of the Innocents," in which the maturing king, emotionally damaged yet purposeful in actor Andrew Rothney's hands, severs his childhood friendships in the same way Shakespeare's Henry dissociates himself from Falstaff.
Each area responded differently to the overthrow of James II in 1688's Glorious Revolution, which brought Protestants William and Mary to the throne.
Both conventional and revisionist historians of the revolution have been too "insular" in their concerns; and, in their fascination with the events of 1688, they have not sufficiently pondered the first three years of the reign of James II, especially in comparison with the deeds of his cousin Louis XIV.
The problem with 1688 is that it was almost always justified in ways that stressed religion: James II was a Catholic and was therefore inclined to use arbitrary authority to advance his insidious goal of undermining Protestantism.
James II. As president and chairman of food distribution company The James Corp., James dedicated 36 years of his life to molding the multigenerational business into a be 100s company.
Charles Edward Stuart ("Bonnie Prince Charlie") was not the son of James II but his grandson.
The Founding Fathers were acutely aware of the example of King James II, whose practice of suspending or dispensing with laws he believed encroached on royal prerogatives eventually occasioned his overthrow in the Glorious Revolution of 1688.
The book, known as a codex, and thought to date from the 1520s, was last heard of in the possession of German-born Baron Philip de Stosch, who spied for the English in Italy against James Edward Stuart, son of King James II, and usually known as "The Old Pretender".
Surely a good Northern Irishman would know that James II of England was the brother of Charles II, not his son (Charles II having had no legitimate offspring).
Three chapters are devoted to James VI and I, and subsequent chapters to Charles I, the exile and restoration of Charles II, and the rule and exile of James II. Schuchard's Stuart kings emerge as knowledgeable supporters of architectural achievement, initiates of masonic lodges in Scotland, and closely tied to the building trades whose members they sometimes raise to high office.