James

(redirected from James I)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to James I: Charles II, James II, James I of England

James

(jāmz),
George C.W., U.S. radiologist, 1915-1972. See: Swyer-James syndrome, Swyer-James-MacLeod syndrome.

James

(jāmz),
Thomas N., 20th-century U.S. cardiologist and physiologist. See: James fibers, James tracts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, the Catholic aristocracy of the Midlands would join in an uprising and kidnap James I's nine-year-old niece from Coombe Abbey to rule in his place.
Written five years ago, there's still a nod towards September 18, with James McArdle's James I delivering a speech Alex Salmond might yet crib and Grabol's Danish Queen Margaret taunting Scotland.
Scholars have long recognized Macbeth as a response to the infamous Gunpowder Plot, a purported Catholic conspiracy to blow up Parliament and King James I's family in one fell swoop in 1605.
While the book primarily deals with theological concepts and texts, a few historical events shape the conversation, including the excommunication of Elizabeth, the first Jesuit missions to England, the accession of James I, and the Gunpowder Plot.
King James I's de facto Prime Minister, Lord Salisbury, succumbed to natural causes, as in the same year (1612) did Prince Henry, the king's precocious son.
Records from the reign of James I make no attempt to conceal the free flow of cash from the pockets of the wealthy into the coffers of the King, often via Court favourites such as the Duke of Buckingham, who acted as brokers.
Dowland later became one of King James I's personal musicians, playing at his funeral in 1626 before his own death in the same year.
History: Following James I's ascension to the English throne in 1603, a simplified version of the current flag--consisting of a red cross on a white background and a white diagonal saltire on a blue background--was used, signifying the king's role as ruler of both England and Scotland.
o descends from Thomas Percy - a conspirator in the November 5 plot in 1605 to blow up parliament - clasped hands with theMarquess of Salisbury, whose ancestor was Robert Cecil, James I's chief minister.
The wedding of Frederick of Pfalz to Elizabeth Stuart in 1613 was one of the great public events in the reign of James I. Much was written about it in a number of languages; this essay investigates the poetic reception in English, Latin and other languages represented in the anthologies edited for or soon after this occasion.
Finally, Leeds Barroll attempts a wide-ranging reappraisal of James I's relationship with the arts, adducing some fine historical detail that allows him to speculate judiciously on the intricate dynamic web of political alignment and artistic representation.