Ivory Wave


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
A product sold as powdered bath salts on the internet, in so-called 'head shops' and market stalls, often with a label 'not for human consumption’. It has been billed as providing a 'legal high' given its content of the psychoactive agent MDPV, a powerful stimulant recently banned in the UK as a Class B drug. Ivory Wave surfaced in the UK drug scene in 2009, and was billed as providing a legal high, prompting warnings to all A&E departments, after dozens of overdose cases appeared in Cumbria, Lothian and Dorset. Not all packages of Ivory Wave contain the same thing—e.g., some have lidocaine—but MDPV has an amphetamine-like effect with tachycardia, tachypnoea, visual and auditory hallucinations, and psychotic reactions so severe that extra hands are needed to keep patients on their trolleys and from harming themselves and others
References in periodicals archive ?
Newlywed Sarah Forsyth, 35, from Essex, died last week after falling into a coma which her mum Margaret Moyles says was brought on by Ivory Wave.
Ivory Wave is sold legally for about Au15 a packet and is advertised as relaxing bath salts.
It said there was clear evidence that substances advertised as new drugs, including Ivory Wave, often contained drugs, such as mephedrone, which are already banned and known to be harmful.
'Ivory wave' contains stimulant methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) and the anaesthetic lignocaine.
But experts said chemists would simply change the ingredients in substances like Ivory Wave - which is sold under the pseudonym bath salts - and sell them under another name.
A YOUNG chef plunged 300ft to his death from a cliff after taking party drug Ivory Wave - unaware that his fiancee was pregnant.
ELEVEN people have been taken to one hospital in the past week after taking new party drug Ivory Wave, it has emerged.
Asking for "meow meow", the officer was offered 500mg of mephedrone powder, marked as "Ivory Wave bath salts" for pounds 20, Ceredigion council said.
According to experts party drugs like Ivory Wave and A3A are stronger and deadlier than ever before.
The move follows the death of Michael Bishton, 24, who was found in the sea at Whitecliff Bay, Isle of Wight, after he took Ivory Wave.
NEW party drug Ivory Wave, believed to be worse than mephedrone, has seen six people admitted into one hospital in a week.
Youngsters suffered hallucinations, anxiety and severe sickness after taking Ivory Wave. Some victims had heart palpitations and turned blue.