Ivor Lewis esophagectomy

Ivor Lewis esophagectomy

(ē'vōr lū'wis),
commonly used approach for esophagectomy via laparotomy and right thoracotomy, with intrathoracic anastomosis.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Ivor Lew·is esoph·a·gec·to·my

(ī'vōr lū'is ĕ-sof'ă-jek'tŏ-mē)
Commonly used approach for esophagectomy using laparotomy and right thoracotomy, with intrathoracic anastomosis
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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Seven patients (58.3%) underwent open Ivor Lewis esophagectomy, four (33.3%) underwent robotic-assisted Ivor Lewis esophagectomy, and one (8.3%) underwent robotic esophageal diverticulectomy (Table 1).
of patients Male 12 (100%) Median age (years) 57.0 (51.5-62.75) Etiology Esophageal cancer 10 (83.3%) GIST 1 (8.3%) Esophageal diverticulum 1 (8.3%) Methods of primary surgery Open Ivor Lewis esophagectomy 7 (58.3%) Robotic-assisted Ivor Lewis esophagectomy 4(33.3%) Robotic esophageal diverticulectomy 1 (8.3%) Data are presented as a median value (interquartile range) or number (%).
In the present study, we found that patients operated with the HMIE approach had a lesser surgical blood loss, had more lymph nodes harvested, and had a shorter hospital stay compared to patients undergoing conventional Ivor Lewis esophagectomy. Furthermore, the HMIE group experienced fewer grade [greater than or equal to] II complications than the conventional group.