itai-itai disease

(redirected from Itai-itai)

i·tai-·i·tai dis·ease

a form of cadmium poisoning described in some Japanese people, characterized by renal tubular dysfunction, osteomalacia, pseudofractures, and anemia, caused by ingestion of contaminated shellfish or other sources containing cadmium.
A form of renal osteodystrophy—osteomalacia with marked bone pain and painful fractures—described in multiparous Japanese women due to cadmium accumulation in bone, caused by industrial pollutants
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O caso mais conhecido de intoxicacao por cadmio por meio dos alimentos ocorreu nas margens do rio Jintsu, na cidade de Funchi-machi, no Japao, logo apos a II Guerra Mundial: um grande numero de pessoas, plantadores de arroz e pescadores foram acometidos de dores reumaticas e mialgias, acompanhadas de deformidades osseas e disturbios renais, o que se denominou doenca Itai-Itai (ouch-ouch) (KAZUYA, 2000).
It was the outbreak of the Itai-Itai bone disease in Japan in the 1960s (9) that really drew the attention of the public and regulatory bodies to this heavy metal that had been discharged in the environment at an uncontrolled rate for more than one century.
The toxic effect of cadmium on bone became evident at the outbreak of Itai-itai disease in Japan, where severe renal and skeletal damage in women was associated with consumption of heavily cadmium-polluted rice (Kjellstrom 1992).
Leafy plants are reported to be good accumulators of Cd which is highly toxic and responsible for nephritis, itai-itai bio (wrong bone metabolism) diseases.
Cadmium, a toxic metallic element, is known to be the cause of Itai-itai Disease, considered to be a type of acquired Fanconi Syndrome characterized by kidney dysfunction and osteomalacia, which plagued a number of people, mainly women, in Toyama Prefecture in the 1950s.
Cadmium is known to be the cause of Itai-itai Disease, considered to be a type of acquired Fanconi Syndrome characterized by kidney dysfunction and osteomalacia, which plagued a number of people, mainly women, in Toyama Prefecture in the 1950s.
Residents of low-lying areas along the river in Toyama Prefecture were the main people affected by the condition, which caused severe twinges and became known as the Itai-Itai Disease.
And in 1950s Japan, mining operations discharged cadmium into water that eventually found its way into the food supply, causing Itai-Itai ("ouch-ouch") disease that results in demineralization of bones.
Cadmium has been linked to postmenopausal bone disease in Japan, where women living in the Jintsu River basin developed a painful bone disease known as Itai-Itai (which means Ouch-Ouch).
This challenges the previous view that the concurrent kidney and bone damage seen in Japanese itai-itai disease patients was the result of Cd toxicity in combination with nutritional deficiencies, notably, of zinc and calcium.
There were reports of women who suffered from symptoms similar to itai-itai disease near zinc mines in southern China.
Long-term exposure to cadmium may cause kidney and bone damage (1); the most well-known example is the itai-itai disease in Japan.