isotope

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isotope

 [i´so-tōp]
a chemical element having the same atomic number as another (i.e., the same number of nuclear protons), but having a different atomic mass (i.e., a different number of nuclear neutrons).
radioactive isotope radioisotope.
stable isotope one that does not transmute into another element with emission of corpuscular or electromagnetic radiations.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

i·so·tope

(ī'sō-tōp), An isotope is identified by its symbol preceded by a superscript numeral showing its mass number (12C). Alternatively the mass number may follow the symbol at the same level (C 12). When the name of the element rather than its symbol is used, the numeral must follow and not precede the name (carbon 12). Do not join the numeral to the symbol or the name with a hyphen. The atomic number of an element (the unvarying number of protons in its nucleus) may be shown by a subscript numeral preceding the symbol 6C).
One of two or more nuclides that are chemically identical, having the same number of protons, yet differ in mass number, because their nuclei contain different numbers of neutrons; individual isotopes are names with the inclusion of their mass number in the superscript position (12C) and the atomic number (nuclear protons in the subscript position (6C). In former usage, the mass numbers follow the chemical symbol (C-12).
[iso- + G. topos, part, place]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

isotope

Imaging
An MRI term for atomic nuclei that contain the same number of protons, but differ in the number of neutrons in the nucleus of the atom for the element concerned.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

i·so·tope

(ī'sŏ-tōp)
One of two or more nuclides that are chemically identical, having the same number of protons, yet differ in mass number, because their nuclei contain different numbers of neutrons; individual isotopes are named with the inclusion of their mass number in the superior position (12C) and the atomic number (nuclear protons) in the inferior position (6C).
[iso- + G. topos, part, place]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

isotope

Chemically identical elements whose atomic nuclei have the same number of protons but different numbers of neutrons. The number of protons determines the number of orbital electrons and hence the chemical properties. Radioactive isotopes are called radionuclides. From the Greek iso -, equal and topos , place. Isotopes occupy the same place in the Periodic table of the elements.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

isotope

any of the forms of an element having the same number of protons (atomic number) but a different number of neutrons (atomic mass). Some isotopes of an element may be radioisotopes (e.g. 12C is not radioactive while 14C is) and yet can function normally in biological material. Isotopes can thus be ‘tagged’ (using suitable detection devices such as geiger counters and autoradiography) as biochemical processes occur. See HALF-LIFE, AUTO RADIO GRAPH.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Isotope

An unstable form of an element that gives off radiation to become stable. Elements are characterized by the number of electrons around each atom. One electron's negative charge balances the positive charge of each proton in the nucleus. To keep all those positive charges in the nucleus from repelling each other (like the same poles of magnets), neutrons are added. Only certain numbers of neutrons work. Other numbers cannot hold the nucleus together, so it splits apart, giving off ionizing radiation. Sometimes one of the split products is not stable either, so another split takes place. The process is called radioactivity.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

i·so·tope

(ī'sŏ-tōp)
One of two or more nuclides that are chemically identical, having the same number of protons, yet differ in mass number, because their nuclei contain different numbers of neutrons.
[iso- + G. topos, part, place]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Key words and phrases : link, string link, ambient isotopy, link-homotopy, closure of a string link.
This subsquence still have an infinite number of normal isotopy classes.
laa, Smarandache isotopy theory of Smarandache: quasigroups and loops, Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Number Theory and Smarandache Problems, Scientia Magna, 4(2008), No.
One of the basic concepts of that theory is the notion of isotopy, which means, roughly speaking, different 'readings' of ambiguous expressions, for which Greimas aims to develop a unified procedure of semantic disambiguation wherever necessary, be it for ordinary language, metaphoric language or humour.
Each chapter pursues a special focus: paradox and the paradoxon (Chapter 2); polysemy and isotopy (3); metaphor (4); surdetermination (5); and Peircean iconicity (6).
(HOD 205; my emphasis) There is little need to insist here on the isotopy of sensual embrace, on the withering effect of being "with-her," for the infantilized subject who has rejoined the originary corpse.
convention/interpretation) Figure 2 Translatoric General language categories Semantics isotopy, titles, compatibility, semantic axes, intertextuality Text function style, discourse markers, speaker's perspective, tense Predicative idioms, mood, focusing, mode quotations Stylistics rhetorical means, rhyme, metaphors, alliteration Form rhythm, prosody, text shape, pictures, verse order Translatoric Language for Special categories Purposes (LSP) Semantics equivalence of terminology, specification of concepts, word compounding Text function genre norms, macrostructure, addressees Predicative speech acts, phraseology, mode passive voice Stylistics functional style, standard formulae, fixed components, controlled language Form illustrations, layout, script fonts
Nevertheless, some assertions appear exaggerated: for instance, that the name Djali is "ungrammatical in the text" (112; Emma being obsessed with her (mis)readings, I cannot see any ungrammaticality here, as it belongs perfectly well to the Romantic isotopy), that Arnoux's shop "recalls that of Magus in La Peau de chagrin" (118) and that "it is the Balzacian intertext that gives rise to L'Education sentimentale's project and gives it its significance" (118).