Isospora belli

I·sos·po·ra bel·'li

a relatively rare species occurring in the small intestine of man, most common in the tropics but probably of worldwide distribution; most infections are subclinical, but sometimes they may cause mucous diarrhea. More serious, persistent diarrhea can occur in immunocompromised patients (for example, those with HIV/AIDS).

Isospora belli

Parasitology A sporozoite parasite common in the tropics/subtropics of the Western Hemisphere/Southeast Asia; it may be underreported, as in uncompromised hosts, it mimics viral gastroenteritis; in AIDS,
I belli may cause fulminant disease Clinical Watery diarrhea ± hemorrhage, colicky pain, weight loss, steatorrhea Management T-S

Isospora belli

A species that causes acute, non-bloody diarrhea with crampy abdominal pain, which can last for weeks in immunocompromised patients, e.g., people with AIDS.
See also: Isospora

Isospora belli

A type of parasitic protozoa.
Mentioned in: Stool O & P Test
References in periodicals archive ?
Cryptosporidium parvum and Isospora belli are relatively easily identified with simple stains (Figs 1 and 2), but excretion in the stools is often intermittent.
Results: Intestinal parasitic pathogens were detected in 35 per cent patients, and the major pathogens included Cryptosporidium parvum (12%) the most common followed by Isospora belli (8%), Entamoeba histolytica/Enatmoeba dispar (7%), Microsporidia (1%) and Cyclospora (0.
The presence of opportunistic parasites Cryptosporidium parvum, Cyclospora cayetanensis, Isospora belli and Microsporidia are documented in patients with AIDS (4).
2004; 18: 1453-8) As a result, a large number of diseases are associated with anal intercourse, many of which are rare or even unknown in the heterosexual population such as: anal cancer, Chlamydia trachomatis, Cryptosporidium, Giardia lamblia, Herpes simplex virus, HIV, Human papilloma virus, Isospora belli, Microsporidia, Gonorrhoea, Syphilis, Hepatitis B and C and others.
Isospora belli was also detected in a fecal sample from the patient.
Isospora belli oocysts and hookworm ova were identified by their characteristic microscopic morphology following standard methods (2).