weight training

(redirected from Isokinetic exercises)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

weight training

a type of resistance-training exercise using barbells, dumbbells, or machines to increase muscle strength. See also strength training.

weight training

A health-promoting exercise which is useful in any age group, especially  the elderly. Weight training increases muscle mass, walking speed, climbing ability and sense of well-being; it is believed to be beneficial in arthritis, cardiovascular disease, depression, type-2 diabetes, obesity, osteoporosis and in increasing gastrointestinal transit time.

weight training

A health-promoting exercise effective in any age group, particularly the elderly; WT ↑ muscle mass, walking speed, climbing ability, and sense of well-being; it may be beneficial for arthritis, cardiovascular disease, depression, type 2 DM, ↑ GI transit time, obesity, osteoporosis
Water balance. Size of the arrows represents relative volumes of water moving in and out of the body, and exchanged internally with the gut, over a typical 24-hour period, with moderate activity in temperate conditions. The circle represents the circulating blood and other extracellular fluids.

weight training

strength ('resistance') training using either free weights or those providing the loads in exercise machines. See also strength training.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, the first aim of this study was to evaluate fatigue time course during an isokinetic exercise composed of six sets of ten maximal concentric contractions separated by three minutes of passive recovery.
Comparable decreases in MVC, Pd and activation level have previously been found after a similar isokinetic exercise (Zory et al.
2003) Maximal voluntary eccentric, isometric and concentric torque recovery following a concentric isokinetic exercise.
Thus it is possible that the time course of recovery be different for lower limb muscles submitted to injury inducing models that use maximal eccentric isokinetic exercise with a low angular speed, firstly because of the function of these muscles in supporting body weight and secondly, because it appears that the pattern of recruiting motor units depends on the speed of movement (Ewing et al.
Thus the objectives of this study were: 1) propose a muscle injury inducing model using maximal eccentric isokinetic exercise with low angular speed; 2) assess the time course of recovery of the quadriceps femoris muscle injured by eccentric exercise with low angular speed, with special attention to functional recovery.
The study was designed to assess the time course of functional recovery of the injured quadriceps femoris muscle in a group of healthy, sedentary subjects submitted to a protocol of muscle injury induction by maximal eccentric isokinetic exercise with low angular speed.