weight training

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weight training

A health-promoting exercise which is useful in any age group, especially  the elderly. Weight training increases muscle mass, walking speed, climbing ability and sense of well-being; it is believed to be beneficial in arthritis, cardiovascular disease, depression, type-2 diabetes, obesity, osteoporosis and in increasing gastrointestinal transit time.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

weight training

A health-promoting exercise effective in any age group, particularly the elderly; WT ↑ muscle mass, walking speed, climbing ability, and sense of well-being; it may be beneficial for arthritis, cardiovascular disease, depression, type 2 DM, ↑ GI transit time, obesity, osteoporosis
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
They also found a significant decrease in the VAS scores; however, they failed to show a significant change in the WOMAC subscores with isokinetic exercises.[9] One of the limitations of this study was that the patients performed only a single day of isokinetic exercise program with 30[degrees]/sec, 60[degrees]/sec, 90[degrees]/sec and 180[degrees]/sec angular velocities.
The study results demonstrated that quadriceps and hamstring strengthening in a six-week program of regular isokinetic exercise had significant effects on balance, proprioception and physical function even in patients who has KL Grade 2 or 3 OA with moderate risk of fall (BBS score of 21-40).
A potential strength of our study is the availability of an isokinetic exercise group, compared to the isometric and aerobic groups.
(2011) Effect of 15 days of betaine ingestion on concentric and eccentric force outputs during isokinetic exercise. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 25, 2235-2241.
Comparable decreases in MVC, Pd and activation level have previously been found after a similar isokinetic exercise (Zory et al., 2010).
(2003) Maximal voluntary eccentric, isometric and concentric torque recovery following a concentric isokinetic exercise. International Journal of Sports Medicine 24, 51-56.
Thus the objectives of this study were: 1) propose a muscle injury inducing model using maximal eccentric isokinetic exercise with low angular speed; 2) assess the time course of recovery of the quadriceps femoris muscle injured by eccentric exercise with low angular speed, with special attention to functional recovery.
The study was designed to assess the time course of functional recovery of the injured quadriceps femoris muscle in a group of healthy, sedentary subjects submitted to a protocol of muscle injury induction by maximal eccentric isokinetic exercise with low angular speed.