butyric acid

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Related to Isobutyric acid: isopentanoic acid

butyric acid

 [bu-tir´ik]
a saturated fatty acid found in butter.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bu·tyr·ic ac·id

(byū-tir'ik as'id),
A foul-smelling acid occurring in butter, cod liver oil, sweat, and many other substances. It exists in two forms: normal butyric acid (also written as N-butyric acid), butanoic acid, which occurs in combination with glycerol in cow's butter; and isobutyric acid, 2-methylpropanoic acid, one of the intermediates in valine catabolism, found in combination with glycerol in croton oil and elsewhere.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

butyric acid

n.
A colorless organic acid, C4H8O2, occurring in animal milk fats and used in disinfectants, emulsifying agents, and pharmaceuticals. Also called butanoic acid.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

butyric acid

Chemistry
An oily carboxylic acid which smells like rancid butter, has an acrid taste and a sweetish aftertaste, like ether. It is present in rancid butter, parmesan cheese and vomit, and is produced in anaerobic fermentation by bacteria in the colon and axilla (resulting in body odour). It is used as a flavourant, perfume additive and cattle-feed supplement.

Fringe oncology
It is believed to have anticarcinogenic activity, especially the derivative, sodium butyrate.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bu·tyr·ic ac·id

(byū-tir'ik asid)
An acid of unpleasant odor occurring in butter, cod liver oil, sweat, and many other substances.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

butyric acid

A water-soluble saturated FATTY ACID occurring in animal milk fats. It has a strong rancid odour.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Initial reaction rates were determined for various concentrations of both substrates, where n-amyl alcohol was varied in the range between 0.15 and 2.35mol/[dm.sup.3] and isobutyric acid in the range between 0.15 and 2.40mol/[dm.sup.3].
where [v.sub.0] is the initial reaction rate, [V.sub.max] is the maximum reaction rate, [Km.sub.al] and [Km.sub.ac] are Michaelis constants for n-amyl alcohol and isobutyric acid, and [K.sub.ial] is the n-amyl alcohol inhibition constant.
However, no significant changes in the propionic acid, acetic acid, butyric acid, and isobutyric acid concentrations were detected.
The presence of more isobutyric acid in lower-density bales from the 587 g [kg.sup.-1] moisture silage indicates the degradation of lactic acid by Clostridium bacteria.
Silage (moisture) High density Low High Low Measurement ([dagger]) density density density 587 g [kg.sup.-1] 524 g [kg.sup.-1] PH 4.7 b 4.9 ab 4.8 b 5.1 a ([double dagger]) Lactic acid 70.0 a 64.6 a 71.4 a 62.8 a Acetic acid 23.9 ab 38.0 a 32.6 a 19.9 b Propionic acid 1.73 a 0.77 b 0.41 b 0.67 b Isobutyric acid 1.14 b 7.01 a 1.82 b 2.99 b Butyric acid -([section]) 0.40 a 0.20 a 0.54 a Isovaleric acid 0.02 a 0.20 a -- -- Valeric acid 0.34 a 0.27 a 0.56 a 0.40 a ([dagger]) High density baled at 358 kg [cm.sup.-2] hydraulic pressure, low density baled at 179 kg [cm.sup.-2] hydraulic pressure.
Experiments later revealed that the wayward individuals had a specific anosmia to isobutyric acid. The fruity smell they detected was the result of the byproducts and impurities usually found in commercial samples of the acid.
The interfacial tension of the isobutyric acid and water system was determined by using a spinning drop tensiometer (SDT).
On the other hand, we also found, as the proportion of dietary corn increased, the propionate, butyrate, isobutyric acid, valerate, isovalerate and TVFA concentrations increased, while the ruminal lactic acid concentration was low, not exceeding 0.5 mM.
The concentrations of propionic acid, isobutyric acid, butyric acid, isovaleric acid and valeric acid were low and varied little throughout the incubation.
The decrease in pH from 6.16 to 5.73 which occurred during fermentation was most likely the result of increased acetic acid as the concentrations of propionic acid, isobutyric acid, butyric acid, isovaleric acid and valeric acid remained below 2.5 mmol/kg after 30-day fermentation.
Ruminal fluid from cows fed GCS, WCS and ESB had lower proportions of butyric acid and isobutyric acid compared with cows fed CON (p<0.05).
Leucine, isoleucine and valine are extensively metabolized within the rumen by anaerobic bacteria, yielding large quantities of isovaleric, 2-methylbutyric and isobutyric acids, respectively (Feng, 2004).