ischium

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ischium

 [is´ke-um]
the inferior, dorsal portion of the hip bone. See anatomic Table of Bones in the Appendices.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

is·chi·um

, gen.

is·chi·i

, pl.

is·chi·a

(is'kē-ŭm, is'kē-ī, is'kē-ă), [TA] Avoid the mispronunciation ish'ē-ŭm.
The lower and posterior part of the hip bone, distinct at birth but later becoming fused with the ilium and pubis; it consists of a body, where it joins the ilium and superior ramus of the pubis to form the acetabulum, and a ramus joining the inferior ramus of the pubis.
Synonym(s): os ischii [TA], ischial bone
[Mod. L. fr. G. ischion, hip]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ischium

(ĭs′kē-əm)
n. pl. is·chia (-kē-ə)
The lowest of the three major bones that constitute each half of the pelvis.

is′chi·al (-əl) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

is·chi·um

, pl. ischia (is'kē-ŭm, -ă) [TA]
The lower and posterior part of the hip bone, distinct at birth but later becoming fused with the ilium and pubis; it consists of a body, where it joins the ilium and superior ramus of the pubis to form the acetabulum, and a ramus joining the inferior ramus of the pubis.
Synonym(s): ischial bone.
[Mod. L. fr. G. ischion, hip]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ischium

The lowest of three bones into which the innominate bone, comprising one side of the pelvis, is divided. The ischial tuberosities are the bony prominences on which we normally sit.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

ischium

the ventral bone of the PELVIC GIRDLE in vertebrates, bearing the weight of a sitting human.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005