Isaac syndrome

(redirected from Isaac-Merton syndrome)

Isaac syndrome

(ī'sik),
a rare disorder resulting from abnormal, spontaneous muscle activity of neural origin, manifested as continuous muscle stiffness and delayed relaxation after exercise, often accompanied by pain, cramps, fasciculations, hyperhydrosis, and muscle hypertrophy (on EMG, manifests as myokymia). Isacc syndrome usually begins in the lower extremities but can affect abdominal, upper extremity, vocal, and respiratory muscles; it is most often sporadic, although autosomal dominant inheritance has been reported. Probably an autoimmune disease, with antibodies against the potassium channels of peripheral nerves.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Isaac syn·drome

, Isaac-Merton syndrome (ī'zăk sin'drŏm, ī'zăks mār'tŏn sin'drōm)
A rare disorder resulting from abnormal, spontaneous muscle activity of neural origin, manifested as continuous muscle stiffness and delayed relaxation after exercise, often accompanied by pain, cramps, fasciculations, hyperhydrosis, and muscle hypertrophy (on electromyography, manifests as myokymia). Disorder usually begins in the lower extremities but can affect abdominal, upper extremity, vocal, and respiratory muscles; it is most often sporadic, although autosomal dominant inheritance has been reported. Probably it is an autoimmune disease, with antibodies against the potassium channels of peripheral nerves.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Isaac syndrome

(i'zaks)
A rare neuromuscular disorder in which continuous signaling of muscle groups by peripheral nerves results in fasciculations, stiffness, and dysarthria. It can be treated with antiepileptic drugs.
Synonym: neuromyotonia
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners