Isaac syndrome

Isaac syndrome

(ī'sik),
a rare disorder resulting from abnormal, spontaneous muscle activity of neural origin, manifested as continuous muscle stiffness and delayed relaxation after exercise, often accompanied by pain, cramps, fasciculations, hyperhydrosis, and muscle hypertrophy (on EMG, manifests as myokymia). Isacc syndrome usually begins in the lower extremities but can affect abdominal, upper extremity, vocal, and respiratory muscles; it is most often sporadic, although autosomal dominant inheritance has been reported. Probably an autoimmune disease, with antibodies against the potassium channels of peripheral nerves.

Isaac syn·drome

, Isaac-Merton syndrome (ī'zăk sin'drŏm, ī'zăks mār'tŏn sin'drōm)
A rare disorder resulting from abnormal, spontaneous muscle activity of neural origin, manifested as continuous muscle stiffness and delayed relaxation after exercise, often accompanied by pain, cramps, fasciculations, hyperhydrosis, and muscle hypertrophy (on electromyography, manifests as myokymia). Disorder usually begins in the lower extremities but can affect abdominal, upper extremity, vocal, and respiratory muscles; it is most often sporadic, although autosomal dominant inheritance has been reported. Probably it is an autoimmune disease, with antibodies against the potassium channels of peripheral nerves.

Isaac syndrome

(i'zaks)
A rare neuromuscular disorder in which continuous signaling of muscle groups by peripheral nerves results in fasciculations, stiffness, and dysarthria. It can be treated with antiepileptic drugs.
Synonym: neuromyotonia
References in periodicals archive ?
Isaac syndrome involves continuously contracting or twitching muscles.
Given the clinical symptoms of involuntary muscle activity in the form of fasciculations, muscle aches, cramps and muscle discomfort along with the findings of repeated discharges with doublets and triplets on electromyography and complete resolution of symptoms by steroids and plasmapheresis we believe our patient was a case of peripheral nerve hyperexcitability and in particular Isaac syndrome.
Hareven first referred to "our primary myth c violence" in a 1976 essay named "Alimut [Violence] (3) In this essay she conducted dialogue with one of Israel's bites noires the criminologist and social critic, Shlomo Giora Shoham--who year earlier had published, in both Israel and America, a rather controversial article, "The Isaac Syndrome." (4) To better understand the thrust of this article, we have to remember that in Israeli public discourse of the time, following the 1967 and 1973 Arab-Israeli wars, the akedah [the Biblical story of the Binding or Sacrifice of Isaac], has come to symbolize not aborted filicide and arrested aggression as in Genesis 22, but rather intergenerational antagonism and even filicide.