irrigation

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irrigation

 [ir″ĭ-ga´shun]
1. washing of a body cavity or wound by a stream of water or other fluid. A steady, gentle stream is used; pressure should be sufficient to reach the desired area, but not enough to force the fluid beyond the area to be irrigated. Pressure may be applied manually, such as with a bulb syringe or mechanical device, or by gravity. The greater the height of the container of solution, the greater will be the pressure exerted by the stream of solution. There are also specially designed irrigating units that deliver a pulsed flow of fluid. Return flow of solution must always be allowed for. Directions about the type of solution to be used, the strength desired, and correct temperature should be followed carefully. Aseptic technique must be observed if sterile irrigation is ordered.
Irrigation of the ears. From Lammon et al., 1996.
2. a liquid used for such washing.
bladder irrigation in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as instillation of a solution into the bladder to provide cleansing or medication.
bowel irrigation in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as instillation of a substance into the lower gastrointestinal tract.
wound irrigation in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as flushing of an open wound to cleanse and remove debris and excessive drainage.

ir·ri·ga·tion

(ir'i-gā'shŭn),
The washing out of a body cavity, space, or wound with a fluid.
[see irrigate]

irrigation

Wound care The cleansing of a space, wound or cavity with a fluid

ir·ri·ga·tion

(ir'i-gā'shŭn)
In surgery, washing out a body cavity, space, or wound with a fluid.
[L. ir-rigo, pp. -atus, to irrigate, fr. in, on, + rigo, to water]

irrigation

The act of flushing with water or some other solution, especially of a wound or body cavity.

irrigation

moistening or pouring water over a preparation.

Irrigation

In medicine, the practice of washing out or flushing a wound or body opening with a stream of water or another liquid.

irrigation;

sulcus, subtarsal.

irrigation

The act of washing or cleansing a cavity or a surface with a stream of water or other solution (e.g. physiological saline) as in chemical or thermal burns or other superficial injuries to the eye, or to dislodge small foreign bodies on the cornea or in the conjunctival sac. See corneal abrasion; lid eversion.

ir·ri·ga·tion

(ir'i-gā'shŭn)
Washing out a body cavity, space, or wound using a fluid.
References in periodicals archive ?
From Figure 1B, chlorophyll destiny of dry land wheat reached the maximum at jointing stage, but at grain- filling stage in irrigated land. This result may be because that nutrient supply and rainfall were sufficient before jointing stage, and abundant chlorophyll was synthesized to accomplish photosynthesis and make organics to meet the need of vegetative growth and reproductive growth.
Because the mean net revenue of irrigated cropland ($1367/ha) is much higher than the net revenue from dryland cropland ($360/ha), the climate elasticities for irrigated land are smaller.
The contribution of the production of hydroelectric and the economic returns on the irrigated land has spurred of Turkish government to implement the Project as soon as possible.
As a result, between 1951 and 1985 Israel expanded its irrigated land area fivefold with only a threefold increase in water use.
KB president Khalid Khan said crops on both irrigated and arid land needed rainfall and that the irrigated land couldn't produce the expected yieldswithout getting rain.
He said the first land reform in the country was promulgated as MLR-64 (1959) by which ceiling of 500 acres of irrigated land or 1000 acres of un-irrigated land on individual holding was fixed.
According to him, the reduction of irrigated land and its productivity is caused by their high degradation and low levels of investment in the construction and rehabilitation of irrigation and drainage systems.
Farmers cultivated 13,500 hectares of irrigated land and 120,000 hectares of rain-fed land this year, he said, adding growers could export 63,000 tonnes of the yield to other provinces.
Over the past century, the amount of irrigated land has grown four fold.
The main causes of the Aral Sea crisis are an increase in irrigated land, inefficient use of water resources and inappropriate agricultural practices, especially the dominance of cotton monoculture.
businessmen stole water from the fruit growers and cattle ranchers of the Owens Valley and made a fortune building subdivisions and the most productive croplands in the world on the newly irrigated land.
Section 10 of the Act stipulates that multi-cropped irrigated land shall not be acquired other than under exceptional circumstances as a demonstrable last resort.