irrationalism

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irrationalism

(ĭ-răsh′ə-nə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. Irrational thought, expression, or behavior; irrationality.
2. Belief in feeling, instinct, or other nonrational forces rather than reason.
References in periodicals archive ?
(He saw the old calendar, in Miles' words, as "an obvious control system accepted unthinkingly by everyone.") On the irrationalist side...oh, where to begin?
(12) Evans, "Is Kierkegaard an Irrationalist? Reason, Paradox, and Faith," 353.
In particular, Martin, like Biro, emphasizes that critical theory could serve as a corrective to an irrationalist tendency in deep ecology, since it offers a sophisticated critique of instrumentalist reason that nonetheless simultaneously preserves a respect for reason more generally.
But insofar as it can be viewed as an exemplum of the phenomenon that Freud called "the return of the repressed," the parallel between Pentheus and Aschenbach, first deniers of the irrationalist abyss, then its victims, holds, tenuously.
Or is it rather from Bicher's own "irrationalist" tendencies, that unfold in the interplay of science/revolution and death?
He wants to protect the social achievements of post-Christian Europe from leftist and irrationalist excesses, just as the neoconservatives wanted to protect New Deal liberalism from the excesses of the 1960's.
On the distinction between imaginative post-modernism, and irrationalist or skeptical post-modernism, compare CALVINO, supra note 6 with RICHARD RORTY, OBJECTIVITY, RELATIVISM, AND TRUTH: PHILOSOPHICAL PAPERS (1991) and TWINING, GLT, supra note 3, at 194-241.
He even earned himself bad reputations of 'irrationalist' and 'relativist'.
Lawrence has suffered (and at times brought upon himself) critical caricatures as late-Romantic irrationalist in flight from scientific modernity and/or arch-humanist berater of scientific pretensions, either of which roles obscures both the thoughtfulness and the thoroughness of Lawrence's best iconoclasms.
All over again the West confronts an irrationalist, agonistic, theocratic/ideocratic system." (1) The British media coverage of Benazir Bhutto's assassination in Pakistan in December 2007, and the broader public discourse surrounding it, provide a neat encapsulation of this "bipolar" (2) paradigm in the way that they present and constitute the "West" and its supposed "Other," here represented by a stylized Pakistan.
"Irrationalist in Chief." The American Prospect 24 September: <www.prospect.org/print/V12/17/mooney-c.html>, accessed 12 February 2006.