food irradiation

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The use of low levels—e.g., < 1 mrad—of ionizing radiation to retard spoilage, so named as it has the same effect as pasteurisation—i.e., it improves shelf life and inactivates bacteria that cause food spoilage
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

food irradiation

The preservation of foods with ionizing radiation. Radiation extends the shelf life of foods by decreasing the number of germs and insects present in them. The process is expensive and has met with considerable resistance from consumers.
See also: irradiation
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

food irradiation

Deliberate exposure of food to strong ionizing radiation, such as gamma rays, to kill bacteria and insect pests and delay natural changes. Irradiation does not eliminate bacterial poisons (toxins) already formed or kill viruses, but irradiation of food tightly sealed in a suitable container, such as a polythene bag, will kill contained bacteria and further contamination does not occur. Food irradiation by gamma rays does not induce radioactivity; the effects are chemical only and may include changes in flavour and some loss of vitamins.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Several techniques are applied to identify the irradiated foods including physical, chemical or biological methods.
In particular, whose interests are they serving in relation to the threats posed by irradiated food? To answer these questions, I will examine three different groups of stakeholders at the centre of food pedagogies in Japan: municipalities, food producers and consumer co-operatives.
Irradiated food must be labeled, so you can avoid it if you wish.
Byron noted at the seminar that although irradiated food was slightly more expensive compared to food treated with pesticides, the radiation could be used to reduce insecticide use while also preventing crop damage by pests.
(2010), "Risk Assessment of Irradiated Foods," [5], 141-170.
The FDA has published a proposed rule that would remove some of the requirements for labeling irradiated food. A decision on this has yet to be made.
And the FDA says there is no reason why irradiated foods shouldn't become the norm.
Recent foodborne illness outbreaks have revived enough interest in irradiation that the Food and Drug Administration is considering a proposed change that would ease the rules on the labeling of irradiated foods. Under the proposal, the FDA would require companies to label irradiated food only when the radiation treatment causes changes to the taste, texture, smell, or shelf life.
All other irradiated food products or ingredients should be clearly labelled treated by ionising radiation' or treated by ionisation'.
Whether you decide to eat irradiated food or not is your choice.
Last year, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) approved irradiated food for the National School Lunch Program despite overwhelming objections from thousands of people who commented on the proposal.
"Apart from high levels of benzene, new chemicals known as unique radiolytic products have been identified in irradiated food since the 1970s.