chromatophore

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chromatophore

 [kro-mat´o-for]
any pigmentary cell or color-producing plastid.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

chro·mat·o·phore

(krō-mat'ō-fōr),
1. A colored plastid, due to the presence of chlorophyll or other pigments, found in certain forms of protozoa.
2. Melanophage; a pigment-bearing phagocyte found chiefly in the skin, mucous membrane, and choroid coat of the eye, and also in melanomas.
3. Synonym(s): chromophore
4. A colored plastid in plants, for example, chloroplasts, leukoplasts, etc.
[chromato- + G. phoros, bearing]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

chromatophore

(krō-măt′ə-fôr′)
n.
1. Any of several types of pigment cells, especially one found in a fish, amphibian, or reptile.
2. A multicellular organ in cephalopods that contains pigment cells.
3. A specialized pigment-bearing organelle in certain photosynthetic bacteria.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

chro·mat·o·phore

(krō-mat'ō-fōr)
1. A plastid, colored because of the presence of chlorophyll or other pigments, found in certain forms of protozoa.
2. Melanophage; a pigment-bearing phagocyte found chiefly in the skin, mucous membrane, and choroid coat of the eye, and also in melanomas.
3. Synonym(s): chromophore.
4. A colored plastid in plants (e.g., chloroplasts, leukoplasts).
[chromato- + G. phoros, bearing]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

chromatophore

A pigment-containing cell.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

chromatophore

  1. (also called chromoplast) a pigmented PLASTID of plant cells which may be green due to the presence of chlorophyll or differently coloured because of the presence of CAROTENOID pigments. CHROMATOPHORES are often CHLOROPLASTS in which the pigment has broken down, as in the ripening of fruit.
  2. (in animals) a cell with pigment in the cytoplasm which can be dispersed or concentrated so changing the colour of the animal as a whole. Animals with this characteristic include frogs, chameleons, cephalopods.
  3. (in photosynthetic bacteria and CYANOBACTERIA) a membranous structure carrying photosynthetic pigments.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
It wasn't until 2013 that biologists discovered that iridophores also played a role.
Biochemical characterization crystals from the dermal iridophores of a chameleon Anolis carolinesis.
Fishes commonly present two main types of light scattering/reflecting chromatophores; i.e., leucophores and iridophores. Leucophores scatter light of wide wavelengths in all directions, they appear whitish when illuminated, and the light reflection is diffuse.
The body is almost solid yellow at 4 DPH, at which time eye pigmentation first appears and the iris iridophores reflect silver.
The bluish coloration of the integument in teleosts is usually generated by light-reflecting chromatophores, called iridophores, that contain very thin light-reflecting platelets in the cytoplasm.
Chromatic expression is achieved by pigmented chromatophores, underlying reflective leucophores and iridophores, and polarizing elements (Mirow, 1972a, b; Messenger, 1974; Packard and Hochberg, 1977; Cloney and Brocco, 1983; Packard, 1988; Mathger and Hanlon, 2007).
Golden epaulettes was a lightened band at the most anterior point of the dorsal mantle that occurred as a result of the contraction of chromatophores (referred to as "Dorsal mantle collar iridophores" by Hanlon, 1988; Hanlon et al., 1994, 1999).
Polarization reflecting iridophores in the arms of the squid Loligo pealeii.
Reflection and polarization of incident light by squid iridophores is accomplished by layers of intracellular platelets that are positioned parallel to each other (5).
Electron microscopy on the mantle of the giant clam with special reference to zooxanthellae and iridophores. Biol.
Expansion of the chromatophores darks the skin, while retraction of the chromatophores (and the resultant expression of underlying iridophores) produces a lightening or even brightening effect.