chromatophore

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chromatophore

 [kro-mat´o-for]
any pigmentary cell or color-producing plastid.

chro·mat·o·phore

(krō-mat'ō-fōr),
1. A colored plastid, due to the presence of chlorophyll or other pigments, found in certain forms of protozoa.
2. Melanophage; a pigment-bearing phagocyte found chiefly in the skin, mucous membrane, and choroid coat of the eye, and also in melanomas.
3. Synonym(s): chromophore
4. A colored plastid in plants, for example, chloroplasts, leukoplasts, etc.
[chromato- + G. phoros, bearing]

chromatophore

/chro·mato·phore/ (-for) any pigmentary cell or color-producing plastid.

chromatophore

(krō-măt′ə-fôr′)
n.
1. Any of several types of pigment cells, especially one found in a fish, amphibian, or reptile.
2. A multicellular organ in cephalopods that contains pigment cells.
3. A specialized pigment-bearing organelle in certain photosynthetic bacteria.

chro·mat·o·phore

(krō-mat'ō-fōr)
1. A plastid, colored because of the presence of chlorophyll or other pigments, found in certain forms of protozoa.
2. Melanophage; a pigment-bearing phagocyte found chiefly in the skin, mucous membrane, and choroid coat of the eye, and also in melanomas.
3. Synonym(s): chromophore.
4. A colored plastid in plants (e.g., chloroplasts, leukoplasts).
[chromato- + G. phoros, bearing]

chromatophore

A pigment-containing cell.

chromatophore

  1. (also called chromoplast) a pigmented PLASTID of plant cells which may be green due to the presence of chlorophyll or differently coloured because of the presence of CAROTENOID pigments. CHROMATOPHORES are often CHLOROPLASTS in which the pigment has broken down, as in the ripening of fruit.
  2. (in animals) a cell with pigment in the cytoplasm which can be dispersed or concentrated so changing the colour of the animal as a whole. Animals with this characteristic include frogs, chameleons, cephalopods.
  3. (in photosynthetic bacteria and CYANOBACTERIA) a membranous structure carrying photosynthetic pigments.

chromatophore

any pigmentary cell or color-producing plastid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Iridophore splotches appeared on the dorsal mantle and the head.
A pairwise comparison test showed that mean durations were significantly higher in the most enduring components, such as clear, iridophore splotches, and bands (P < 0.
Iridophores contain reflecting platelets, mostly composed of guanine crystals, and are responsible for reflection of light.
Some are simple units made of melanophores and leucophores, or melanophores and iridophores, and the synergistic action of the chromatophores that form these simple units responding to neural changes is the basis of rapid color changes (Herring 1994, Fujii et al.
In contrast, leucophores and iridophores have light-reflecting substances in organelles that allow for scattering or interference phenomena of the incident light (1-3).
Studies of the physiological and morphological features of the bluish colorations of tropical fish have shown that the integumental bluish hues are generated by a multi-layered interference phenomenon of the "non-ideal" type in piles of extremely thin-film reflecting platelets formed inside the iridophores (9-13).
Malleable skin coloration in cephalpods: selective reflectance, transmission and absorbance of light by chromatophores and iridophores.
Moreover, silver staining and acetylcholinesterase histochemistry suggest that these iridophores are under direct neural control, unlike any known cephalopod iridophore.
Reflection and polarization of incident light by squid iridophores is accomplished by layers of intracellular platelets that are positioned parallel to each other (5).
Electron microscopy on the mantle of the giant clam with special reference to zooxanthellae and iridophores.
Dorsal mantle collar iridophores are on the anteriormost portion of the mantle, and they appear as bright yellow or pink iridescence; this component tends to produce disruptive coloration by breaking up the longitudinal aspect of the squid's body.
Two iridescent components, both thought to aid in crypsis, were also observed: Dorsal mantle collar iridophores and Dorsal mantle splotches; these are not illustrated but can be seen in color plates in Hanlon (1982).