iodine

(redirected from Iodine deficiency)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Iodine deficiency: Magnesium deficiency

iodine

 (I) [i´o-dīn]
a chemical element, atomic number 53, atomic weight 126.904. (See Appendix 6.) Iodine is essential in nutrition, being especially prevalent in the colloid of the thyroid gland. It is used in the treatment of hypothyroidism and as a topical antiseptic. Iodine is a frequent cause of poisoning (see iodism). Deficiency of iodine causes goiter. Since iodine salts are opaque to x-rays, they can be combined with other compounds and used as contrast media in diagnostic x-ray examinations of the gallbladder and kidneys.
iodine 123 a radioactive isotope of iodine having a half-life of 13.2 hours and emitting gamma rays and x-rays. It is used in diagnostic imaging and as radiation sources in radiation therapy. Symbol 123I.
iodine 125 a radioisotope of iodine having a half-life of 60.14 days and emitting gamma rays; used as a label in radioimmunoassays and other in vitro tests, and also for thyroid imaging. Symbol 125I.
iodine 131 a radioactive isotope of iodine having a half-life of 8.04 days and emitting beta particles and gamma rays. It is used as a tracer in diagnostic imaging and as a radiation source in radiation therapy. Symbol 131I.
protein-bound iodine a test of thyroid function; see also protein-bound iodine test.
radioactive iodine radioiodine.
iodine solution a transparent, reddish brown liquid, each 100 ml of which contains 1.8 to 2.2 g of iodine and 2.1 to 2.6 g of sodium iodide; a local antiinfective agent.
strong iodine solution Lugol's solution.

i·o·dine (I),

(ī'ō-dīn, -dēn),
A nonmetallic chemical element, atomic no. 53, atomic wt. 126.90447; used in the manufacture of iodine compounds and as a catalyst, reagent, tracer, constituent of radiographic contrast media, topical antiseptic, antidote for alkaloidal poisons, and in certain stains and solutions; formerly used for prophylaxis of iodine deficiency.
[G. iōdēs, violet-like, fr. ion, a violet, + eidos, form]

iodine

(ī′ə-dīn′, -dĭn, -dēn′)
n.
1. Symbol I A lustrous, purple-black, corrosive, poisonous halogen occurring as a diatomic molecule, I2, that easily sublimes to give a purple gas and is a trace element essential for proper thyroid function. Radioactive isotopes, especially I-131, are used as medical tracers and in thyroid disease diagnosis and therapy. Iodine compounds are used as germicides, antiseptics, and dyes. Atomic number 53; atomic weight 126.9045; melting point 113.7°C; boiling point 184.4°C; density of gas 11.27 grams per liter; specific gravity (solid, at 20°C) 4.93; valence 1, 3, 5, 7. See Periodic Table.
2. An antiseptic preparation containing iodine in solution, used to treat wounds.

iodum

Homeopathy
A homeopathic remedy used for those with thyroid dysfunction, nonfocused hyperactivity and forgetfulness; it is also used for cardiovascular disease, coughs and laryngitis.

io·dine

(I) (ī'ŏ-dīn, ī'ŏ-dēn)
A nonmetallic chemical element, atomic no. 53, atomic wt. 126.90447; used as a catalyst, reagent, tracer, constituent of radiographic contrast media, therapy in thyroid disease, antidote for alkaloidal poisons, and component of some stains and solutions.
[G. iōdēs, violet-like, fr. ion, a violet, + eidos, form]

iodine

A halogen element which, in small quantities, is an essential component of the diet. Iodine is poisonous in excess and is sometimes used in an alcoholic or aqueous potassium iodide solution as an antiseptic. The radioactive isotope, iodine 131, is extensively used for thyroid imaging and thyroid function tests. The drug is on the WHO official list.

antiseptic 

An agent that kills or prevents the growth of bacteria. This term is generally restricted to agents that are sufficiently non-toxic for superficial application to living tissues. These include the preservatives for eye drops and contact lens solutions. Examples of antiseptics are alcohol, benzalkonium chloride, cetrimide, chlorbutanol, chlorhexidine, hydrogen peroxide, thimerosal (or thiomersalate). Other agents that are too toxic to be applied to living tissues are called disinfectants and are used to sterilize instruments and apparatus. See disinfection; ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid; neutralization; sterilization.

io·dine

(I) (ī'ō-dīn, ī'ŏ-dēn)
A nonmetallic chemical element, used in manufacture of iodine compounds and as a catalyst, reagent, or tracer among other purposes.
[G. iōdēs, violet-like, fr. ion, a violet, + eidos, form]
References in periodicals archive ?
Concurrently, a nationwide public awareness campaign through mass media, with sustained advocacy should highlight the importance of preventing iodine deficiency, particularly among women and to remove any myths and misconceptions associated with its consumption.
The ratio of iodine deficiency in upper areas is high as compared to low lying localities therefore awareness should be created among the residents of such places where reports of iodine deficiency are being received, he added.
It is known that chronic iodine deficiency causes goitre.
He said that iodine deficiency disorder was a serious public health threat for people living in remote villages consuming salt without iodine.
Kiwanis International, a worldwide service organization in more than 82 nations and geographic areas, partnered with UNICEF in a global effort to eliminate iodine deficiency disorders (IDD).
WHO Global Database on Iodine Deficiency. World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
The researchers found that women who had moderate-to-severe iodine deficiency had a 46% lower chance of becoming pregnant during each menstrual cycle, compared to women who had sufficient iodine concentrations.
Due to the depletion of iodine from soil over time, older soil surfaces have a greater iodine deficiency. As a result, iodine deficiency disorders can increase with altitude and distance from the coast.
Iodine deficiency during pregnancy has been associated with maternal hypothyroxinemia that is related to growth, cognitive, and psychomotor deficit in neonates, infants, and children [6].
He added that serious complications could take place if a woman suffered from iodine deficiency during pregnancy.
The USI was recommended by a joint World Health Organisation (WHO), United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and the International Council for the Control of Iodine Deficiency Disorders (ICCIDD) expert committee; it is a policy of iodizing all salt used in households, catering, food processing, food industry and agriculture [14].
Iodine deficiency causes a spectrum of diseases called iodine deficiency disorders (IDD), which affect all stages of life from early pregnancy to the adult.