involution

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involution

 [in″vo-lu´shun]
1. a rolling or turning inward.
2. one of the movements involved in the gastrulation of many animals.
3. a retrograde change of the entire body or in a particular organ, as the retrograde changes in the female genital organs that result in normal size after delivery.
4. the progressive degeneration occurring naturally with advancing age, resulting in shriveling of organs or tissues. adj., adj involu´tional.
Involution of the uterus. Height of the uterine fundus decreases by approximately 1 cm/day. From McKinney et al., 2000.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·vo·lu·tion

(in'vō-lū'shŭn),
1. Return of an enlarged organ to normal size.
2. Turning inward of the edges of a part.
3. In psychiatry, mental decline associated with advanced age.
Synonym(s): catagenesis
[L. in-volvo, pp. -volutus, to roll up]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

involution

(ĭn′və-lo͞o′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of involving.
b. The state of being involved.
2. Intricacy; complexity.
3. Something, such as a long grammatical construction, that is intricate or complex.
4. Mathematics An operation, such as negation, which, when applied to itself, returns the original number.
5. Embryology The ingrowth and curling inward of a group of cells, as in the formation of a gastrula from a blastula.
6. Medicine
a. A decrease in size of an organ, as of the uterus following childbirth.
b. A progressive decline or degeneration of normal physiological functioning occurring as a result of the aging process.

in′vo·lu′tion·al adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

involution

Gynecology See Uterine involvement Medtalk A ↓in organ size or functional capacity, generally understood to be age-related.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·vo·lu·tion

(in'vŏ-lū'shŭn)
1. Return of an enlarged organ to normal size.
2. Turning inward of the edges of a part.
3. psychiatry Mental decline associated with advanced age.
Synonym(s): catagenesis.
[L. in-volvo, pp. -volutus, to roll up]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

involution

1. Decay, retrogression or shrinkage in size.
2. A return to a former state.
3. An infolding or INVAGINATION.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

involution

(of plant organs) having rolled-up margins.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

in·vo·lu·tion

(in'vŏ-lū'shŭn)
1. Return of an enlarged organ to normal size.
2. Turning inward of the edges of a part.
[L. in-volvo, pp. -volutus, to roll up]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
If D [member of] Der(A) is an involutive derivation, then, for all [x.sub.1], ..., [x.sub.n] [member of] A,
Since involutive residuated lattices are involutive residuated EQ-algebras, which are good involutive EQ-algebras, we can obtain some related results about fuzzy filters in residuated lattices.
for each [lambda] [member of] L \ {[0.sub.[L.sup.*]], [1.sub.[L.sup.*]]} and x, y [member of] X; here, N is an involutive negator.
All the previous considerations apply, in particular it is still true that h [right arrow] [h.sup.[sigma]] is an involutive isometry from [H.sup.2.sub.R] onto [H.sup.2.sub.0,R].
Another way to express this involutive process is to specify, in the basic model: one equation for the excess exodus; one representing the inflationary effect of this exodus; one equation for real wages in the dynamic sector depending on the sectoral increase in labour productivity; the impossibility for this sector (due to international competition) to charge the costs caused by the excess exodus to domestic inflation.
They are increasingly tempted by involutive pullbacks.
Let [H'.sub.lambda] be the dense subspace of functions in [H.sub.lambd] whose moduli are integrable over [G.sub.Q]\[I.sub.lambda]: then [H'.sub.lambda] is an involutive algebra under convolution (see Lemma I of [CPI).
Qiao, "A hierarchy of nonlinear evolution equations and finite-dimensional involutive systems," Journal of Mathematical Physics, vol.
(1) If a [less than or equal to] b, then N(b) [less than or equal to] N(a), where N: H [right arrow] H is an involutive order reversing operation in (H, [less than or equal to]).
A bounded left-pBCK algebra is said to be with property ([pDN.sup.L]), or involutive, if it verifies ([pDN.sup.L]).
Besides, we prove that the set of all [tau]- measurable functions f : [OMEGA] [right arrow] M forms an involutive complex algebra and is closed under the point wise limit.