involuntary sterilization


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involuntary sterilization

Any procedure that renders a legally incompetent person permanently infertile. It is performed only under court order, and only when other less drastic means of preventing unwanted procreation have failed.
See also: sterilization
References in periodicals archive ?
regarding funding for abortions and involuntary sterilization (section
Cutchin that the involuntary sterilization of a black woman through tubal ligation after a C-section was not a battery, reasoning that it "was not harmful because it did not cause any additional physical pain, injury, or illness other than that occasioned by the C-section procedure.
72) The memorandum stated that "an applicant whose spouse was forced to undergo an abortion or involuntary sterilization has suffered past persecution, and may thereby be eligible for asylum under the terms of the new refugee definition.
This amounts to a change over time toward a greater emphasis on involuntary sterilization for men and voluntary sterilization that targeted nonmentally defective women.
Professor of political science and history, Edwin Black calls the involuntary sterilization of unsuspecting women and men--eugenicide, or the systematic annihilation of a group of hapless people through eugenical-sterilization.
The most famous case of involuntary sterilization was that of Carrie Bell, a woman from Virginia who was alleged to have had mental retardation.
The United States Supreme Court issued its opinion on May 2, 1927 with an eight to one affirmation of the Virginia involuntary sterilization law.
involuntary sterilization, capacity for responsible sexual behaviour, care giver attitudes) will be discussed.
In May, the American investigators found "no evidence that UNFPA has knowingly supported or participated in the management of a program of coercive abortion or involuntary sterilization in the [People's Republic of China]" and recommended release of the $34 million appropriation.
For instance, during the 1920s and _30s, dozens of states engaged in involuntary sterilization of "habitual criminals" and "feebleminded" individuals.
Supreme Court struck down an Oklahoma eugenics law that authorized involuntary sterilization for individuals convicted of three or more "felonies involving moral turpitude.
By 1910, genetic statutes had been enacted in Washington, California, and Connecticut, and by the end of the 1920s, twenty-four states had passed involuntary sterilization laws.