civil commitment

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civil commitment

Involuntary hospitalization, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
There's not only a need to increase the number of treatment centers overall, but many of those facilities would also need to be secured to ensure the safety and treatment efficacy of involuntary commitment patients.
In January 2014, the ATF responded to the states' confusion on the federal NICS-reporting requirements by suggesting an amendment to the definition of "committed to a mental institution" that would clarify that involuntary commitment includes both inpatient and outpatient treatment.
viewed involuntary commitment as an amorphous breed of civil action.
As I mentioned, involuntary commitment has been made very difficult, and the time and paperwork involved is substantial.
Assuming that the Due Process Clause can serve as the foundation for a theory of constitutional procedure that creates a procedural continuum varying based on the three prongs of Mathews, removal proceedings currently require less procedural safeguards than criminal, parole and probation revocation, involuntary commitment proceedings, and parental termination hearings.
50) Any longer period of detention must comply with standard involuntary commitment procedures, and non-compliance with the order is not itself grounds for commitment.
Before the Humphrey, O'Connor, and Jackson decisions, involuntary commitment laws were usually justified on police-power grounds, or under the doctrine of parens patriae, which provides that the state is authorized to act in an individual's best interest even if it is against her wishes.
Keeping in mind the severe effects of involuntary commitment, the high standard of proof that is required in commitment hearings, and the fact that it is difficult to define dangerousness and to predict whether someone will be dangerous, E.
Focusing on contemporary perceptions of gender, sexuality, class, disability and eugenics, the work examines the involuntary commitment of girls and young women deemed by reformers to be "defective" and sheds light on both the dominant social trends of the day as well as the ways in which the victims of these policies sought to mitigate their conditions.
In this package, reason examines the most fanciful theories about Loughner's rampage, highlights some of the more extreme post-shooting policy ideas (including involuntary commitment of the mentally disturbed), and analyzes the ways in which Loughner's profile resembles those of political assassins throughout history.