civil commitment

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civil commitment

Involuntary hospitalization, see there.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Public records related to mental health, such as records of involuntary commitment, are inherently less reliable as a deciding factor regarding future violent tendencies than an individualized determination.
Within states that do have involuntary commitment laws in place, experts say, many treatment centers and medical centers don't fully understand these laws or highlight their potential use with the loved ones of prospective clients.
was a patient in need of further treatment and that there was no less restrictive alternative than involuntary commitment and treatment.
involuntary commitment proceedings do not encompass the right against
In January 2014, the ATF responded to the states' confusion on the federal NICS-reporting requirements by suggesting an amendment to the definition of "committed to a mental institution" that would clarify that involuntary commitment includes both inpatient and outpatient treatment.
of involuntary commitment and established the precedent that such an
As I mentioned, involuntary commitment has been made very difficult, and the time and paperwork involved is substantial.
The balance between the Mathews factors-and the weaker individual interest at stake in parental termination hearings-explains why parental termination hearings afford less process than criminal, juvenile delinquency, parole and probation revocation, and involuntary commitment proceedings.
(21) Outpatient commitment also acted as the least restrictive alternative for individuals who met the already-existing standard for involuntary commitment as an inpatient.
Sues for Involuntary Commitment: Summary Judgment for Defendants Affirmed
Absent an emergency involuntary commitment proceeding (discussed below), such an admittedly mentally ill but not judicially adjudged incompetent patient must be permitted to leave the hospital.
Focusing on contemporary perceptions of gender, sexuality, class, disability and eugenics, the work examines the involuntary commitment of girls and young women deemed by reformers to be "defective" and sheds light on both the dominant social trends of the day as well as the ways in which the victims of these policies sought to mitigate their conditions.