involuntary euthanasia


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Related to involuntary euthanasia: passive euthanasia, active euthanasia

involuntary euthanasia

Euthanasia performed without a competent person's consent.
See also: euthanasia
References in periodicals archive ?
(88) Opponents sharply criticized the bill as destroying the medical community and creating a slippery slope towards involuntary euthanasia. (89) Supporters of the bill claimed that the DWDA would provide patients with merciful end-of-life options.
Involuntary euthanasia is a situation when a patient's life is ended without the patient's knowledge.
But Latimer merely elevated the public awareness of the problem of involuntary euthanasia and then slipped into the shadows, leaving no vestige of a solution.
The situation of involuntary euthanasia is much more of a concern as there is no autonomy and we need to err on the side of protecting those who cannot speak for themselves.
Government-imposed involuntary euthanasia because Medicare Advantage is getting trimmed?
He objected not only to hazards of abuse accompanying legalized hastenings of death, but also to eventual extensions of PAD to "far more objectionable practices." (118) At that time, Kamisar primarily feared extension of PAD to nonvoluntary euthanasia (for patients who were not competent to make their own medical decisions) and to involuntary euthanasia (contrary to a competent patient's wishes or to the wishes of a surrogate representing a mentally incompetent patient).
``Voluntary euthanasia inevitably leads to involuntary euthanasia so this is bad news for anyone who feels old, frail and vulnerable.
Quite simply, the argument that voluntary euthanasia leads to involuntary euthanasia is unproven as is the scaremongering that Mr Crew's death is bad news for anyone who feels old, frail and vulnerable.
THE Government is likely to decide this week whether to launch an inquiry into allegations that an 86-year-old Welsh grandmother was killed as part of an unacknowledged "involuntary euthanasia" policy in the NHS.
Michael Willis, the chairman of the Pro-Life Alliance, said, "I think the BMA's statement is a disturbing development which indicates a softening on the present position which could lead to involuntary euthanasia. It would mean that the medical profession had a free hand to kill at will without protection of law." Id.
Singer's "preference utilitarianism" even goes so far as to endorse infanticide and involuntary euthanasia for the disabled (LAETF, 1999).
The interviewer further addressed the controversial issue of involuntary euthanasia by asking whether participants thought they had the right to make the decision in regard to the death of a close family member.