inversion

(redirected from Inversions)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Inversions: temperature inversions

inversion

 [in-ver´zhun]
1. a turning inward, inside out, or other reversal of the normal relation of a part.
2. in psychiatry, a term used by Freud for homosexuality.
3. a chromosomal aberration due to the inverted reunion of the middle segment after breakage of a chromosome at two points, resulting in a change in sequence of genes or nucleotides.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·ver·sion

(in-ver'zhŭn),
1. A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one.
2. Conversion of a disaccharide or polysaccharide by hydrolysis into a monosaccharide; specifically, the hydrolysis of sucrose to d-glucose and d-fructose; so called because of the change in optic rotation.
3. Alteration of a DNA molecule made by removing a fragment, reversing its orientation, and putting it back into place.
4. Heat-induced transition of silica, in which the quartz tridymite or cristobalite changes its physical properties as to thermal expansion.
5. Conversion of a chiral center into its mirror image.
[L. inverto, pp. -versus, to turn upside down, to turn about]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

inversion

(ĭn-vûr′zhən)
n.
1.
a. The act of inverting.
b. The state of being inverted.
2. Psychology In early psychology, behavior or attitudes in an individual considered typical of the opposite sex, including sexual attraction to members of one's own sex. No longer in technical use.
3. Chemistry Conversion of a substance in which the direction of optical rotation is reversed, from the dextrorotatory to the levorotatory or from the levorotatory to the dextrorotatory form.
4. Genetics A chromosomal rearrangement in which a segment of the chromosome breaks off and reattaches in the reverse direction.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

inversion

Orthopedics A frontal plane movement of the foot, where the plantar surface is tilted to face the midline of the body or the medial sagittal plane; the axis of motion lies on the sagittal and transverse planes; a fixed inverted position is referred to as a varus deformity
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·ver·sion

(in-vĕr'zhŭn)
1. A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one.
2. Conversion of a disaccharide or polysaccharide by hydrolysis into a monosaccharide; specifically, the hydrolysis of sucrose to d-glucose and d-fructose; so called because of the change in optic rotation.
3. Alteration of a DNA molecule made by removing a fragment, reversing its orientation, and putting it back into place.
4. Heat-induced transition of silica, in which the quartz tridymite or cristobalite changes its physical properties as to thermal expansion.
[L. inverto, pp. -versus, to turn upside down, to turn about]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

inversion

a CHROMOSOMAL MUTATION in which a segment becomes reversed and, although there is no loss or gain of genetic material, there may be a positive or negative POSITION EFFECT on the phenotype.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

in·ver·sion

(in-vĕr'zhŭn)
A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one.
[L. inverto, pp. -versus, to turn upside down, to turn about]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Theorem 8 Let [E.sub.nk] be the number of 000-avoiding inversion sequences of length n with k distinct entries.
We have the following relationship between simsun permutations and 000-avoiding inversion sequences.
For the 1989:Q1 to 1989:Q2 inversions, forecasters generally did a good job predicting the 10-year rate for 1989:Q1; however, they failed to forecast the drop in 10-year rates that occurred in 1989 :Q2.
In contrast to the two earlier inversions, professional forecasters generally predicted upward paths of 10-year Treasury rates in 2005 and 2006.
Research has shown that surface-based SHUM inversions are accompanied by temperature inversions 70% of the time, which then increase to 90% in the direction of the continent's interior (grid E), while in Western Europe, they do not exceed 60%.
Although SHUM inversions occur more frequently in the winter, their depth is small, especially in privileged areas, and they range from <70 hPa in the Scandinavian Peninsula to about 80 hPa over other land areas (Figure 7).
For both academic and public policy reasons, we should develop a holistic understanding of inversions as not just a tax problem, but also a non-tax issue.
Given these two premises, I argue that inversions are not simply a tax problem in isolation, but a problem of aligning tax paid with benefits conferred by a given country.
There are many sources of uncertainties influencing a source mechanism inversion, such as the data noise (e.g.
We have chosen condition numbers as one of the commonly used and robust measures of inversion stability, but other parameters might be used to evaluate source mechanism quality as well, e.g., error ellipsoid (Zahradnik and Custodio, 2012).
In this section, we present numerical inversions for the inverse problem of (1), (4)-(5) with (14).
The authors study 73 inversions that occurred from 1983 to 2014 for which equity price data are available.