inversion

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Related to Inversion layer: Temperature inversion, Thermal inversion

inversion

 [in-ver´zhun]
1. a turning inward, inside out, or other reversal of the normal relation of a part.
2. in psychiatry, a term used by Freud for homosexuality.
3. a chromosomal aberration due to the inverted reunion of the middle segment after breakage of a chromosome at two points, resulting in a change in sequence of genes or nucleotides.

in·ver·sion

(in-ver'zhŭn),
1. A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one.
2. Conversion of a disaccharide or polysaccharide by hydrolysis into a monosaccharide; specifically, the hydrolysis of sucrose to d-glucose and d-fructose; so called because of the change in optic rotation.
3. Alteration of a DNA molecule made by removing a fragment, reversing its orientation, and putting it back into place.
4. Heat-induced transition of silica, in which the quartz tridymite or cristobalite changes its physical properties as to thermal expansion.
5. Conversion of a chiral center into its mirror image.
[L. inverto, pp. -versus, to turn upside down, to turn about]

inversion

/in·ver·sion/ (in-ver´zhun)
1. a turning inward, inside out, or other reversal of the normal relation of a part.
2. a term used by Freud for homosexuality.
3. a chromosomal aberration due to the inverted reunion of the middle segment after breakage of a chromosome at two points, resulting in a change in sequence of genes or nucleotides.

inversion of uterus  a turning of the uterus whereby the fundus is forced through the cervix, protruding into or completely outside of the vagina.
visceral inversion  the more or less complete right and left transposition of the viscera.

inversion

(ĭn-vûr′zhən)
n.
1.
a. The act of inverting.
b. The state of being inverted.
2. Psychology In early psychology, behavior or attitudes in an individual considered typical of the opposite sex, including sexual attraction to members of one's own sex. No longer in technical use.
3. Chemistry Conversion of a substance in which the direction of optical rotation is reversed, from the dextrorotatory to the levorotatory or from the levorotatory to the dextrorotatory form.
4. Genetics A chromosomal rearrangement in which a segment of the chromosome breaks off and reattaches in the reverse direction.

inversion

[invur′zhən]
Etymology: L, invertere, to turn over
1 an abnormal condition in which an organ is turned inside out, such as a uterine inversion.
2 a chromosomal defect in which a segment of a chromosome breaks off and then reattaches to the chromosome in the reverse orientation, causing the genes carried on that part of the chromosome to be in an abnormal position and sequence.

inversion

Orthopedics A frontal plane movement of the foot, where the plantar surface is tilted to face the midline of the body or the medial sagittal plane; the axis of motion lies on the sagittal and transverse planes; a fixed inverted position is referred to as a varus deformity

in·ver·sion

(in-vĕr'zhŭn)
1. A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one.
2. Conversion of a disaccharide or polysaccharide by hydrolysis into a monosaccharide; specifically, the hydrolysis of sucrose to d-glucose and d-fructose; so called because of the change in optic rotation.
3. Alteration of a DNA molecule made by removing a fragment, reversing its orientation, and putting it back into place.
4. Heat-induced transition of silica, in which the quartz tridymite or cristobalite changes its physical properties as to thermal expansion.
[L. inverto, pp. -versus, to turn upside down, to turn about]

inversion

a CHROMOSOMAL MUTATION in which a segment becomes reversed and, although there is no loss or gain of genetic material, there may be a positive or negative POSITION EFFECT on the phenotype.
Figure 1: The sites of the main nerve centres and descending pathways in the brain and spinal cord that control voluntary movement, represented in diagrammatic sections.

inversion

with reference to the foot: tilting of the sole inwards. inversion injury a common injury to the ankle joint in sport. Inversion of the foot usually occurs as a result of 'going over' on the ankle when the foot strikes the ground, especially if uneven or if the person is off balance. Results in damage to the lateral ligament complex, with bleeding, swelling and pain. Importantly affects proprioception and thus balance, necessitating a formal treatment and rehabilitation programme. See also anterior talofibular ligament; Figure 1.

inversion

turning inward

in·ver·sion

(in-vĕr'zhŭn)
A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one.
[L. inverto, pp. -versus, to turn upside down, to turn about]

inversion,

n the state of being upside down.

inversion

1. a turning inward, inside out, or other reversal of the normal relation of a part.
2. a chromosomal aberration due to the inverted reunion of the middle segment after breakage of a chromosome at two points, resulting in a change in sequence of genes or nucleotides.

paracentric inversion
the inverted segment does not include the chromosome's centromere; has exactly the same size and shape as a normal chromosome but will have different banding patterns.
pericentric inversion
an inversion in a chromosome in which the centromere is included in the inverted segment.
teat inversion
the tip is invaginated so that the orifice is closed by the act of sucking. Causes a problem to sucking pigs. Affected sows should be culled.
References in periodicals archive ?
Limitations of this analysis include the fact that risk estimates are based on PAH concentrations measured in winter, when the combination of inversion layers, higher emissions from combustion sources, and reduced atmospheric degradation all lead to higher concentrations than would likely be found in other months of the year.
His work suggested that strong radiative cooling at the surface was limited by the higher temperatures above the inversion layer.
on summer days, after the inversion layer rises high enough to let the pollutants spill over the San Gabriel Mountains, experts say.
In communities like Colorado Springs, in which airborne particulates, inversion layers, or brown clouds may be problems, pre-wetting may provide additional promising benefits which need further exploration.
According to the meteorological department, the favourable conditions for smog were created by a western disturbance and an inversion layer.
Spraying with no wind present is dangerous, due to potential problems with vaporization and inversion layer conditions; spraying when wind conditions are too high is equally dangerous.
They had fog and low clouds and a weak inversion layer.
Willamette Valley residents continue to experience smoky conditions as a nighttime inversion layer traps smoke near the ground and funnels it downhill into the valley, only to be blown out again as afternoon winds develop and the inversion lifts.
The 10,000-foot peak is just at the top of an inversion layer.
When freezing weather threatens, some growers turn on wind machines, which pull warmer air down from the inversion layer and circulate it through the grove.
As the inversion layer is formed only in the extremely shallow region of the substrate just beneath the AG, there is no lateral spread.
June gloom'' that stretched into July, and early October rains coupled with a weak inversion layer, allowed pollutants to disperse instead of lingering to form unhealthy ozone.