inversion

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Related to Inversion layer: Temperature inversion, Thermal inversion

inversion

 [in-ver´zhun]
1. a turning inward, inside out, or other reversal of the normal relation of a part.
2. in psychiatry, a term used by Freud for homosexuality.
3. a chromosomal aberration due to the inverted reunion of the middle segment after breakage of a chromosome at two points, resulting in a change in sequence of genes or nucleotides.

in·ver·sion

(in-ver'zhŭn),
1. A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one.
2. Conversion of a disaccharide or polysaccharide by hydrolysis into a monosaccharide; specifically, the hydrolysis of sucrose to d-glucose and d-fructose; so called because of the change in optic rotation.
3. Alteration of a DNA molecule made by removing a fragment, reversing its orientation, and putting it back into place.
4. Heat-induced transition of silica, in which the quartz tridymite or cristobalite changes its physical properties as to thermal expansion.
5. Conversion of a chiral center into its mirror image.
[L. inverto, pp. -versus, to turn upside down, to turn about]

inversion

/in·ver·sion/ (in-ver´zhun)
1. a turning inward, inside out, or other reversal of the normal relation of a part.
2. a term used by Freud for homosexuality.
3. a chromosomal aberration due to the inverted reunion of the middle segment after breakage of a chromosome at two points, resulting in a change in sequence of genes or nucleotides.

inversion of uterus  a turning of the uterus whereby the fundus is forced through the cervix, protruding into or completely outside of the vagina.
visceral inversion  the more or less complete right and left transposition of the viscera.

inversion

(ĭn-vûr′zhən)
n.
1.
a. The act of inverting.
b. The state of being inverted.
2. Psychology In early psychology, behavior or attitudes in an individual considered typical of the opposite sex, including sexual attraction to members of one's own sex. No longer in technical use.
3. Chemistry Conversion of a substance in which the direction of optical rotation is reversed, from the dextrorotatory to the levorotatory or from the levorotatory to the dextrorotatory form.
4. Genetics A chromosomal rearrangement in which a segment of the chromosome breaks off and reattaches in the reverse direction.

inversion

[invur′zhən]
Etymology: L, invertere, to turn over
1 an abnormal condition in which an organ is turned inside out, such as a uterine inversion.
2 a chromosomal defect in which a segment of a chromosome breaks off and then reattaches to the chromosome in the reverse orientation, causing the genes carried on that part of the chromosome to be in an abnormal position and sequence.

inversion

Orthopedics A frontal plane movement of the foot, where the plantar surface is tilted to face the midline of the body or the medial sagittal plane; the axis of motion lies on the sagittal and transverse planes; a fixed inverted position is referred to as a varus deformity

in·ver·sion

(in-vĕr'zhŭn)
1. A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one.
2. Conversion of a disaccharide or polysaccharide by hydrolysis into a monosaccharide; specifically, the hydrolysis of sucrose to d-glucose and d-fructose; so called because of the change in optic rotation.
3. Alteration of a DNA molecule made by removing a fragment, reversing its orientation, and putting it back into place.
4. Heat-induced transition of silica, in which the quartz tridymite or cristobalite changes its physical properties as to thermal expansion.
[L. inverto, pp. -versus, to turn upside down, to turn about]

inversion

a CHROMOSOMAL MUTATION in which a segment becomes reversed and, although there is no loss or gain of genetic material, there may be a positive or negative POSITION EFFECT on the phenotype.
Figure 1: The sites of the main nerve centres and descending pathways in the brain and spinal cord that control voluntary movement, represented in diagrammatic sections.

inversion

with reference to the foot: tilting of the sole inwards. inversion injury a common injury to the ankle joint in sport. Inversion of the foot usually occurs as a result of 'going over' on the ankle when the foot strikes the ground, especially if uneven or if the person is off balance. Results in damage to the lateral ligament complex, with bleeding, swelling and pain. Importantly affects proprioception and thus balance, necessitating a formal treatment and rehabilitation programme. See also anterior talofibular ligament; Figure 1.

inversion

turning inward

in·ver·sion

(in-vĕr'zhŭn)
A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one.
[L. inverto, pp. -versus, to turn upside down, to turn about]

inversion,

n the state of being upside down.

inversion

1. a turning inward, inside out, or other reversal of the normal relation of a part.
2. a chromosomal aberration due to the inverted reunion of the middle segment after breakage of a chromosome at two points, resulting in a change in sequence of genes or nucleotides.

paracentric inversion
the inverted segment does not include the chromosome's centromere; has exactly the same size and shape as a normal chromosome but will have different banding patterns.
pericentric inversion
an inversion in a chromosome in which the centromere is included in the inverted segment.
teat inversion
the tip is invaginated so that the orifice is closed by the act of sucking. Causes a problem to sucking pigs. Affected sows should be culled.
References in periodicals archive ?
At a monitored burn near Holtville, the ground-level wind direction was to the north, but the upper-level plume at the apparent inversion layer moved to the south.
Scorching temperatures create a strong inversion layer that traps pollutants near the surface and ``cooks'' them into ozone, which is the key ingredient in smog.
Incident meteorologist John Saltenberger said an inversion layer is forming over the fire area at night, bottling up smoke and pushing it downslope all the way to the valley only to be blown out in the afternoon when the inversion lifts.
The result is a strong inversion layer with warm air in the atmosphere acting as a lid, trapping pollutants in the Los Angeles Basin.
Our geography, the presence of a very strong atmospheric inversion layer, and air pollution from all sources, from cars to trucks to consumer products, have elevated our smog to Stage 1 levels,'' said Barry Wallerstein, executive director for the air quality district.
Then an inversion layer hangs low over the region and traps the pollutants close to the ground.
A strong inversion layer traps ozone in the basin, while the absence of monsoon-like muggy conditions in August and September left little moisture in the air to shake things up, the AQMD officials said.
Trapped by an unusually strong inversion layer, smoke from the 12,000-acre Williams Fire settled over hundreds of square miles - from Riverside to Ventura County, the San Fernando Valley and north to the Antelope Valley - shrouding the region in gray.
Experts say if the coming months bring wind, rain or other conditions to whip up the air and avoid an inversion layer, it will allow carbon monoxide emissions to rise and disperse - although residents can also do their part by tuning up their car engines and driving less, if such a thing were possible.
The inversion layer that traps smog above Los Angeles also produces some of the best ``seeing'' in the world, meaning there's little air turbulence to distort sunlight or starlight.