inverse-square law

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inverse-square law

The intensity of radiation or light at any distance is inversely proportional to the square of the distance between the irradiated surface and a point source. Thus, a light with a certain intensity at a 4-ft distance will have only one-fourth that intensity at 8 ft and would be four times as intense at a 2-ft distance.
See also: law
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in·verse-square law

(in-vĕrs' skwār law)
A rule relating to radiation stating that intensity of radiation is inversely proportional to the square of the distance from radiation source to irradiated surface.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In almost every case I have examined, the budgeting managers have overridden the maintenance department advice and induced my "Inverse-Square Rule for Deferred Maintenance".
* When the size-doubling T-score ratios for recognition and recall are themselves treated as a ratio, we have an inter-gender size-doubling ratio that is an inverse-square. This may suggest the verbal nature of the size-doubling task.
If it is as fast, one would expect inverse-square law attenuation of the psi signal.
If two stars have the same absolute brightness, but one is twice as far away, it appears one-fourth as bright as the nearby one--a relationship known as the inverse-square law.
The inverse-square law of sound intensity decrease with distance would apply: every doubling of distance from the sound source reduces the sound intensity by 6 dB.
Test of Newton's inverse-square law in the Greenland ice cap.
I will also describe two equivalence experiments and a test of the inverse-square law of gravitation.
Any extra dimensions affecting gravity would alter Isaac Newton's inverse-square law, which holds that objects attract each other with a force inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.
Test of Newton's Inverse-Square Law in the Greenland Ice Cap, Physical Review Letters, 1989, v.
The brainchild of astronomer Mordehai Milgrom, MOND posits that when gravity gets really weak--as it does in the outskirts of galaxies--it no longer follows Isaac Newton's inverse-square law.