inverse care law


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inverse care law

A truism of healthcare, observed by UK doctor Julian Tudor-Hart, that those who most need medical care are the least likely to get it.
References in periodicals archive ?
To our shame, the inverse care law persists, despite 70 years of a national health service, and it continues to blight the lives of millions across the UK.
Through the work of Julian Tudor-Hart, who sadly passed away in July of this year, Glyncorrwg will be written in the annals of history as the birthplace of the inverse care law and preventative medicine as we know it today.
In 1978 the well-known GP Julian Tudor-Hart coined the idea of the "inverse care law".
Understanding the inverse care law: A register and survey-based study of patient deprivation and burnout in general practice.
The Inverse Care Law Programme was set up in the South Wales Valleys - in the Cwm Taf and Aneurin Bevan University health board areas - to identify people at higher risk of developing the heart condition and to deliver a programme of community-based intervention.
In accordance with the inverse care law (34), private providers may prioritize patients according to lowest risk rather than greatest need.
Two innovative inverse care law schemes in Aneurin Bevan and Cwm Taf university health board areas, which aim to reduce premature deaths from cardiovascular disease in deprived communities;
It will provide the vital information that commissioners at all levels require in order to meet this growing need, to support more older people to remain independent, to reverse the inverse care law and to close the health inequalities gap.
"Health services can make a difference and tackling health inequalities means tackling the inverse care law, whereby good medical services are not always accessible to those who need them most."
The analysts concluded: "In part this may be influenced through the operation of an 'inverse care law' where the benefits of health programmes accrue to the more advantaged groups who have awareness and knowledge of how to use the system' and the reach of public services can be weaker in disadvantaged areas.
Victor encouraged delegates to work against the 'inverse care law', saying: 'Health visitors and school nurses need to join up and make your connection visible--because if we don't, the inverse care law will continue to exist.'