invasive fungal sinusitis


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invasive fungal sinusitis

Sinus, ophthalmic, and cerebral invasion by opportunistic fungi. The disease usually occurs in immunosuppressed patients (such as diabetic or neutropenic patients) and is frequently fatal despite aggressive medical and surgical therapies. Aspergillus, Mucor, and Rhizopus are the most commonly implicated causes.
See also: sinusitis
References in periodicals archive ?
The distinction between acute invasive fungal sinusitis and acute sinusitis of nonmycotic origin determines which type of adjuvant medical therapy should be combined with surgical treatment.
We were consulted on this case after CT findings raised a concern about the possibility of invasive fungal sinusitis. Although there were no gross findings on the patient's face, including the nasal ala, endoscopic examination revealed areas of necrosis in the middle turbinate and septum, a finding that was confirmed by biopsy.
Chronic invasive fungal sinusitis is generally difficult to eradicate, it recurs frequently, and it carries a poor prognosis.
However, this case differs from ours in that this patient had several predisposing factors for invasive fungal sinusitis; he was diabetic, and he had received a liver transplant for hepatitis C-related cirrhosis.
In this article, we describe a case of P boydii invasive fungal sinusitis in a diabetic patient who died before the pathogen was identified.
Granulomatous invasive fungal sinusitis occurs in an immunocompetent host and is usually unilateral.
The purpose of this article is to describe a chronic variant of invasive fungal sinusitis (IFS) and discuss its management.
Aggressive combination treatment for invasive fungal sinusitis in immunocompromised patients.
Invasive fungal sinusitis progresses rapidly in immunocompromised patients, and its early signs and symptoms can be subtle.
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