invasion

(redirected from Invasions)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

in·va·sion

(in-vā'zhŭn),
1. The beginning or incursion of a disease.
2. Local spread of a malignant neoplasm by infiltration or destruction of adjacent tissue; for epithelial neoplasms, invasion signifies infiltration beneath the epithelial basement membrane.
3. Entrance of foreign cells into a tissue, such as polymorphonuclear leukocytes in inflammation.
[L. invasio, fr. in-vado, pp. -vasus, to go into, attack]

invasion

/in·va·sion/ (-va´zhun)
1. the attack or onset of a disease.
2. the simple, harmless entrance of bacteria into the body or their deposition in tissue, as opposed to infection.
3. the infiltration and destruction of surrounding tissue, characteristic of malignant tumors.

invasion

(ĭn-vā′zhən)
n.
The entry into bodily tissue and subsequent proliferation of an injurious entity, such as a pathogen or tumor.

invasion

[invā′zhən]
Etymology: L, in, within, vadere, to go
the process by which malignant cells move through the basement membrane and gain access to blood vessels and lymphatic channels.

invasion

Oncology The penetration of a basement membrane and extension into the stroma by a neoplasm which usually, but not invariably, implies a malignancy with metastatic potential. See Bulldozing invasion, Lymph node inclusions, Metastasis, Perineural invasion, Pseudoinvasion, Stabbing invasion, Vascular invasion.

in·va·sion

(in-vā'zhŭn)
1. The beginning or incursion of a disease.
2. Local spread of a malignant neoplasm by infiltration or destruction of adjacent tissue; for epithelial neoplasms, invasion signifies infiltration beneath the epithelial basement membrane.
3. Entrance of foreign cells into a tissue, such as polymorphonuclear leukocytes in inflammation.
[L. invasio, fr. in-vado, pp. -vasus, to go into, attack]

invasion

the entry and colonization of a host by an organism.

invasion

local spread, e.g. of infection; neoplasm

in·va·sion

(in-vā'zhŭn)
1. Beginning or incursion of disease.
2. Local spread of a malignant neoplasm by infiltration or destruction of adjacent tissue.
3. Entrance of foreign cells into tissue.
[L. invasio, fr. in-vado, pp. -vasus, to go into, attack]

Patient discussion about invasion

Q. How successful s minimally invasive surgery for knee replacements?

A. Approximately 300,000 knee replacements are performed each year in the United States. and it said that 90% of the people who had a total knee replacement report an improvement in their function. i searched the CDC statistics for failure of the surgery and couldn't find any info about it. but as i said- it's a very common surgery. my grandmother had a hip joint replacement due to arthritis, it helped.
here is something that might help you to prepare for the surgery:

http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00220#Understand the Procedure

good luck!!

Q. Has anyone had a minimally invasive partial knee replacement? How did it go and are you pleased? I will be having one in the next few weeks and would just like some input. Thanks...

A. Hmm... Never underwent it myself, but you may read some more here:
http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00405

and you may also watch it here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cm6_qxd3P3Q

Take care,

More discussions about invasion
References in periodicals archive ?
However, foreign media reported the pitch invasion following Manchester United's extra-time victory against Arsenal last week, which led to isolated scuffles between rival fans.
These guidelines were nevertheless frequently violated; most seriously by the Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty and Iraq's invasion of Kuwait.
3) Similar to home invasions, the object of store diversions is to steal a business' daily cash receipts.
Police said they are concerned about the invasions because the police do conduct raids on a regular basis.
The scientists also said that there is a need to establish a work agenda to evaluate "not only current invasions, but also those that could happen in the future in mountainous environments.
It describes the mechanisms of invasions and establishment, the extent to which the recipient community can influence invasions rates, methods for identifying and tracking invasions, molecular approaches to the study of invasive seaweed, control methods, and global and regional law and policy responses.
multilocularis invasions into Hokkaido have occurred (1).
The economics-enhanced model predicted 75 percent of the state-by-state variation in plant invasions.
With the release David Cronenberg's Spider and Denys Arcand's Les Invasions barbares, two outstanding films by our best directors (both of which appeared on the recent TIFF list of the top Canadian films of all time), a record four films that broke the $5-million bar at the domestic box office (Seraphin, Seducing Doctor Lewis, Doctor Lewis, Les Invasions barbares and Mambo Italiano), significant wins at Cannes (Best Screenplay and Best Actress for Les Invasions barbares) and Canada's second Oscar[R] for a fictional feature (Best Foreign-Language Film for the aforementioned Les Invasions), 2003 will go down as a high-water mark for future generations to match.
If one is going to undertake Klismaphilia for consensual sexual fulfillment, it is above all vital to follow safety guidelines --but whether one intends to personally undergo the experience or simply wishes to learn more about it, Intimate Invasions is not to be missed.
In 1963, Ballantyne et al observed that many perineural invasions by malignancies of the head and neck were cutaneous in origin.
The experimental patients had aggressive cases of skin carcinoma with skull-base invasions.