Inuit

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Inuit

(ĭn′ū-ĭt) [Eskimo people]
People native to Arctic America.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps Inuk, unbalanced as he is, describes it best in his jaded narration:
The muskox is considered to be a unique, iconic animal; an integral part of the landscape; and connected to Inuit culture and identity: "muskox means identity, where we come from!" (Inuk woman, Interviewee 13).
Things come to a head when social services takes Inuk away from home and he winds up on the east coast of Greenland--near the land of his ancestors--where he gets paired up with an embittered hunter, Ikuma (Ole Jorgen Hammeken).
It blamed lower-than-expected international sales and a 4% decline in Mulberry's wholesale shipments, which took the shine off a 13% hike in retail sales to PS46.5m, including a 10% rise inUK sales.
The pure white and blue beauty of Greenland's stunning icy landscape is paired with an involving story of a traumatized teen reconnecting with his ancestral ways in Mike Magidson's enjoyable feature debut, "Inuk." A rare Greenland production (with joint French coin), this is solid fanlily fare that combines a sympathetic protag with an exotic locale for overall pleasant entertainment.
The documentary Inuk (US-France-Denmark) will be screened.
"We're happy they've allowed us to do this for the villagers, as many of them are elderly people, women and children," said Peter Inuk, one of the tractor owners.
He's an Inuk from Iqualit, the politically correct way of saying he's an eskimo.
In the opening scene of Igloolik Isuma Productions' documentary Qallunajatut/ Urban Inuk (2005), we are introduced to the story of Jayson Kunnuk, a homeless Inuk living in downtown Montreal, Quebec.
The researchers now have a good idea of what Inuk, as they call him, looked like and where he came from: His closest genetic relatives lived on the eastern tip of Siberia, which points to a previously unknown migration of people across North America, from Siberia to Greenland, 5,500 years ago.
Danish-led excavations more than 20 years ago unearthed four fragmentary bones and several hair tufts belonging to this ancient man, dubbed Inuk. His frozen remains were found at a site from the Saqqaq culture, the earliest known people to have inhabited Greenland.