introspection

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introspection

 [in″tro-spek´shun]
contemplation or observation of one's thoughts and feelings; self-analysis. adj., adj introspec´tive.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·tro·spec·tion

(in'trō-spek'shŭn),
Looking inward; self-scrutinizing; contemplating one's own mental processes.
[intro- + L. specto, to look at, inspect]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

introspection

(ĭn′trə-spĕk′shən)
n.
Contemplation of one's own thoughts, feelings, and sensations; self-examination.

in′tro·spec′tion·al adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

introspection

Psychiatry Self-observation; examination of one's feelings, especially through psychotherapy
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·tro·spec·tion

(in'trō-spek'shŭn)
Looking inward; self-scrutinizing; contemplating one's own mental processes.
[intro- + L. specto, to look at, inspect]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

introspection

Examination, usually prolonged, of one's own thoughts, feelings, and sensations.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The fourth type Hefts calls people-oriented introspectionists, who are able to articulate their active lives in terms of an internal focus.
Thus it is that when examining the nature of thinking Jenkins concentrates on imagist elements in Hume's account, his associationism, and introspectionist approaches to memory and imagination.
What he does, rather, is, first, to provide evidence, gleaned mainly from early experiments in introspectionist psychology, which he takes to support his view that there are experiences as of volitions and, second, to respond to Ryle's Concept of Mind attack on the idea that people have experiences as of volitions.