intracranial hemorrhage

(redirected from Intracranial hemorrhages)

hemorrhage

 [hem´ŏ-rij]
the escape of blood from a ruptured vessel; it can be either external or internal. Blood from an artery is bright red in color and comes in spurts; that from a vein is dark red and comes in a steady flow. Aside from the obvious flow of blood from a wound or body orifice, massive hemorrhage can be detected by other signs, such as restlessness, cold and clammy skin, thirst, increased and thready pulse, rapid and shallow respirations, and a drop in blood pressure. If the hemorrhage continues unchecked, the patient may complain of visual disturbances, ringing in the ears, or extreme weakness.
capillary hemorrhage oozing of blood from minute vessels.
cerebral hemorrhage a hemorrhage into the cerebrum; one of the three main causes of cerebral vascular accident (stroke syndrome).
concealed hemorrhage internal hemorrhage.
fibrinolytic hemorrhage that due to abnormalities of fibrinolysis and not hypofibrinogenemia.
internal hemorrhage that in which the extravasated blood remains within the body.
intracranial hemorrhage bleeding within the cranium, which may be extradural, subdural, subarachnoid, or cerebral.
petechial hemorrhage subcutaneous hemorrhage occurring in minute spots.
postpartum hemorrhage that which follows soon after labor.
primary hemorrhage that which soon follows an injury.
secondary hemorrhage that which follows an injury after a considerable lapse of time.

in·tra·cra·ni·al hem·or·rhage

bleeding within the cranial vault; includes cerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

intracranial hemorrhage

Intracerebral hemorrhage Neurology Periventricular or cerebral hemorrhage, which may be subdural, parenchymal, intraventricular, subarachnoid; IH is more common in preterm infants Etiology Tentorial tears and skull fractures and birth-related trauma linked to operative delivery Imaging CT in first 24 hrs, MRI after 24 hrs. Cf Periventricular leukomalacia.

in·tra·cra·ni·al hem·or·rhage

(in'tră-krā'nē-ăl hem'ŏr-ăj)
Escape of blood within the cranium due to loss of integrity of vascular channels, frequently forming a hematoma.

in·tra·cra·ni·al hem·or·rhage

(in'tră-krā'nē-ăl hem'ŏr-ăj)
Bleeding within cranial vault.
References in periodicals archive ?
Intracranial hemorrhages due to thrombocytopenia or serious cardiac defects are often the cause of death (1).
Perhaps the most feared hemorrhagic event related to warfarin is intracranial hemorrhage. The incidence of warfarin-associated intracranial hemorrhage is 1-5% and it accounts for 10-12% of all intracranial hemorrhages.
Postoperative intracranial hemorrhages may happen after spinal surgery in different places in the brain, such as the epidural or subdural space and the supratentorial or cerebellar parenchyma.
Most reported intracranial hemorrhages associated with meningiomas are found in the subarachnoid and subdural spaces.
Simultaneous multiple hypertensive intracranial hemorrhages. J Clin Neurosci.
They address the common presentations, subtypes, biomechanics, and outcomes of abusive head trauma, then common presentations, treatment, diagnostic significance, and related conditions of specific medical mimics: birth trauma, congenital malformations, benign extra axial fluid of infancy, genetic and metabolic disorders, hematological diseases and disorders of coagulation and clotting, autoimmune and vasculitic conditions, medical and surgical complications with intracranial hemorrhages, infectious diseases, oncologic mimics, superior sagittal sinus thrombosis, toxins, poisons, nutritional deficiencies, short falls, motor vehicle collisions, and mimics of abusive fractures.
New research published online in the journal BMJ suggests that combining antidepressants with painkillers such as naproxen, ibuprofen, or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may moderately increase the risk for intracranial hemorrhages. Intracranial hemorrhages involve bleeding under the skull that can lead to permanent brain damage or even death.
Among the 18,966 patients in the study who had no history of stroke and body weight of at least 60 kg (72% of the total study population), treatment with vorapaxar over a median of 2.5 years led to an absolute 1.9% reduction in the incidence of new MI, stroke, or cardiovascular death, while causing a 0.2% excess of intracranial hemorrhages and a 1% excess of other moderate or severe bleeding events, Dr.
Among the 18,966 patients in the study who had no history of stroke and body weight of at least 60 kg (72% of the to-tal study population), treatment with vorapaxar over a median of 2.5 years led to an absolute 1.9% reduction in the in-cidence of new MI, stroke, or cardiovas-cular death, while causing a 0.2% excess of intracranial hemorrhages and a 1% ex-cess of other moderate or severe bleed-ing events, Dr.
It is important that rivaroxaban demonstrated non-inferior safety and that there were numerically fewer intracranial hemorrhages versus warfarin.
Over the 28-day study period, there were eight intracranial hemorrhages in the Xigris group, compared with five in the placebo group.
Adverse events in the cases included stillbirths, low Apgar scores, neonatal trauma, fetal acidosis, seizures, neonatal intensive care unit admission, Erb's palsy, cephaihematoma, subgaleal and other intracranial hemorrhages, neonatal death, and cerebral palsy

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