intracranial hemorrhage

(redirected from Intracranial haemorrhage)

hemorrhage

 [hem´ŏ-rij]
the escape of blood from a ruptured vessel; it can be either external or internal. Blood from an artery is bright red in color and comes in spurts; that from a vein is dark red and comes in a steady flow. Aside from the obvious flow of blood from a wound or body orifice, massive hemorrhage can be detected by other signs, such as restlessness, cold and clammy skin, thirst, increased and thready pulse, rapid and shallow respirations, and a drop in blood pressure. If the hemorrhage continues unchecked, the patient may complain of visual disturbances, ringing in the ears, or extreme weakness.
capillary hemorrhage oozing of blood from minute vessels.
cerebral hemorrhage a hemorrhage into the cerebrum; one of the three main causes of cerebral vascular accident (stroke syndrome).
concealed hemorrhage internal hemorrhage.
fibrinolytic hemorrhage that due to abnormalities of fibrinolysis and not hypofibrinogenemia.
internal hemorrhage that in which the extravasated blood remains within the body.
intracranial hemorrhage bleeding within the cranium, which may be extradural, subdural, subarachnoid, or cerebral.
petechial hemorrhage subcutaneous hemorrhage occurring in minute spots.
postpartum hemorrhage that which follows soon after labor.
primary hemorrhage that which soon follows an injury.
secondary hemorrhage that which follows an injury after a considerable lapse of time.

in·tra·cra·ni·al hem·or·rhage

bleeding within the cranial vault; includes cerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

intracranial hemorrhage

Intracerebral hemorrhage Neurology Periventricular or cerebral hemorrhage, which may be subdural, parenchymal, intraventricular, subarachnoid; IH is more common in preterm infants Etiology Tentorial tears and skull fractures and birth-related trauma linked to operative delivery Imaging CT in first 24 hrs, MRI after 24 hrs. Cf Periventricular leukomalacia.

in·tra·cra·ni·al hem·or·rhage

(in'tră-krā'nē-ăl hem'ŏr-ăj)
Escape of blood within the cranium due to loss of integrity of vascular channels, frequently forming a hematoma.

in·tra·cra·ni·al hem·or·rhage

(in'tră-krā'nē-ăl hem'ŏr-ăj)
Bleeding within cranial vault.
References in periodicals archive ?
M2 EQUITYBITES-June 18, 2019-Zebra Medical Vision passes third US FDA 510(k) clearance for its HealthICH product used to identify intracranial haemorrhage (ICH)
Global Banking News-June 18, 2019-Zebra Medical Vision passes third US FDA 510(k) clearance for its HealthICH product used to identify intracranial haemorrhage (ICH)
Erich Schmutzhard defined neurocritical care as the intensive care management of patients with life-threatening neurological and neurosurgical illnesses like severe stroke, intracranial haemorrhage, severe traumatic brain injury, acute cerebral hypoxia and anoxia, life threatening infectious and inflammatory diseases of the nervous system to technical issues like intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure.
The primary efficacy outcome was first serious vascular event, which included non-fatal heart attacks, non-fatal strokes or transient ischaemic attacks (sometimes called mini-strokes), or deaths from a cardiovascular cause (but excluding any intracranial haemorrhage; i.e.
WORLDWIDE COMPUTER PRODUCTS NEWS-May 22, 2018-MaxQ Artificial Intelligence wins CE mark for intracranial haemorrhage software
Mendoza, "Prenatal sonographic diagnosis of intracranial haemorrhage: report of a case with a sinusoidal fetal heart rate tracing, and review of the literature," Prenatal Diagnosis, vol.
Our patient was a 43 year old female, known diabetic with a history of intracranial haemorrhage (managed conservatively).
Obstetric sonography was done which was suggestive of a single live intrauterine gestation corresponding with growth appropriate for gestational age with moderate polyhydramnios (AFI 25cms) with hyperechoic cerebral cisterns suggestive of intracranial haemorrhage. Fetal MRI was done which revealed generalized atrophy of the brain parenchyma with subdural haematoma over posterior cerebral convexities extending along tentorial leaflets.
A CT scan is performed in order to determine whether the patient's paralysis symptom is caused by a cerebral or carotid embolism, or an intracranial haemorrhage. It is crucial to tell the difference between an embolism and a haemorrhage, as the wrong treatment can worsen the patient's symptoms and, in the worst case scenario, lead to the patient's death.
CT scan of brain showed 26(55.31%) cases of cerebral infarction and 21(44.68%) intracranial haemorrhage. Regarding risk factors, 37 patients were hypertensive, 9 had ischemic heart disease and 6 had diabetes mellitus.
Included in this definition is the cascade of pathophysiological events that lead to progressive worsening of the initial injury, such as intracranial haemorrhage and cerebral oedema.

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