large intestine

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large in·tes·tine

[TA]
the distal (aboral) portion of the digestive tube extending from the ileocecal valve to the anus; it comprises the cecum (with appendix), colon, rectum, and anal canal; shorter in length but larger in caliber than the small intestine, the large intestine functions to absorb fluids and electrolytes and provide temporary storage.
Synonym(s): intestinum crassum [TA]

large intestine

n.
The portion of the intestine that extends from the ileum to the anus, forming an arch around the convolutions of the small intestine and including the cecum, colon, rectum, and anal canal. Also called large bowel.

large intestine

Etymology: L, largus, abundant, intestinum
the part of the digestive tract comprising the cecum; appendix; ascending, transverse, descending, and sigmoid colons; and rectum. The ileocecal valve separates the cecum from the ileum.

watershed infarct

Neurology Infarction of a region peripheral to 2 arteries and susceptible to ischemia; WIs are often hemorrhagic, as restoration of the circulation allows blood to flow into damaged capillaries and 'leak' into the ischemic tissue
Watershed infarctions-locations
Brain  After internal carotid artery occlusion, causing vascular 'steal' phenomena, or between the anterior and middle cerebral arteries, which may be compromised in circle of Willis occlusions, often in a background of generalized atherosclerosis and as a possible complication of directed therapeutic embolization; cerebral perfusion may be impaired by cardiac arrest, pericardial tamponade and ex-sanguination
Large intestine At either the splenic flexure, the site of anastomosis between the inferior and superior mesenteric arteries, or at the rectum, a region supplied by peripheral irrigation from the inferior mesenteric artery and the hypogastric artery

large in·tes·tine

(lahrj in-tes'tin) [TA]
The portion of the digestive tube extending from the ileocecal valve to the anus; it comprises the cecum, colon, rectum, and anal canal.
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SMALL INTESTINE: (duodenum, jejunum, ileum)
Enlarge picture
LARGE INTESTINE

large intestine

The large intestine extends from the ileum to the anus and is about 1.5 m (5 ft) in length. It absorbs water, minerals, and vitamins from the intestinal contents and eliminates undigested material during defecation. The mucosa has no villi but contains glands that secrete mucus. Hyperactivity of the colon may cause diarrhea. See: illustration

The first part of the large intestine is the cecum, a pouch on the right side into which the ileum empties. Attached to the cecum is the vermiform appendix, about 7.5 to 10.4 cm (3 to 4 in) long. The ascending colon extends from the cecum upward to the undersurface of the liver, where it turns left (hepatic flexure) and becomes the transverse colon, which continues toward the spleen and turns downward (splenic flexure) to become the descending colon. At the level of the pelvic brim, the descending colon turns inward in the shape of the letter S and is then called the sigmoid colon. The rectum, about 10.2 to 12.7 cm (4 to 5 in) long, is the straight part that continues downward; the last 2.5 cm (1 in) is called the anal canal, which surrounds the anus.

illustration
See also: intestine

large intestine

The part of the intestine that extends from the end of the ILEUM to the ANUS. It starts in the lower right corner of the abdomen with the caecum, from which the APPENDIX protrudes, proceeds as the ascending COLON to the upper right corner, loops across to the upper left corner as the transverse colon then descends to the lower left corner as the descending colon. The intestine then swings down and centrally as the sigmoid colon and continues as the rectum and the anal canal. The main function of the colon is to reabsorb water from the bowel contents. The rectum is a temporary store for faeces.

large intestine

the lower part of the gut, consisting of caecum, appendix, colon and rectum, and leading to the anus.

large in·tes·tine

(lahrj in-tes'tin) [TA]
The portion of the digestive tube extending from the ileocecal valve to the anus; it comprises the cecum, colon, rectum, and anal canal.

large intestine,

n the portion of the digestive tract comprising the cecum; the appendix; the ascending, transverse, and descending colons; and the rectum. The ileocecal valve separates the cecum from the ileum.

intestine

the part of the alimentary tract extending from the pyloric opening of the stomach to the anus. It is a musculomembranous tube lined with a secretory and/or absorptive mucosa, comprising the small intestine and large intestine; called also bowel and gut. See also intestinal tract.
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Distended and congested loops of intestine in a cow with intussusception. By permission from Blowey RW, Weaver AD, Diseases and Disorders of Cattle, Mosby, 1997

large intestine
small intestine

large

dimensionally big.

large bietou
Dimorphotheca acuneata. See also osteospermum.
large chicken louse
see goniodesgigas.
large intestine
see cecum (1), colon, rectum.
large leaved lupine
lupinuspolyphyllus.
large liver fluke
see fascioloidesmagna, fasciolagigantica.
large roundworm
in swine called Ascaris suum.
large stomach worm
large strongyles
in horses are Strongylus vulgaris, S. edentatus, S. equinus; in donkeys S. asini.
References in periodicals archive ?
The continuous tube that forms the various organs (mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, rectum and anus) consists of layers that make up the bowel wall.
When doctors talk about the digestive tract, they mean the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine or colon, rectum, and anus.
Gastroenterologists are physicians who specialise in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, including the oesophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, pancreas, liver, gallbladder, and biliary system.
The 18-month-old had her liver, pancreas, small intestine, large intestine, stomach and spleen replaced with organs from a single donor.