leaky gut syndrome

(redirected from Intestinal permeability)
Also found in: Acronyms.
Gastrointestinal tract dysfunction caused by antibiotics, toxins, poor diet, parasites or infections, leading to increased intestinal wall permeability and absorption of toxins, bacteria, fungi, parasites, etc; LGS may be linked to allergy and autoimmunity

leaky gut syndrome

Intestinal permeability syndrome A GI tract dysfunction caused by ↑ permeability of the intestinal wall, which allows absorption of toxic material–bacteria, fungi, parasites, etc; LGS may be linked to allergy and various autoimmune conditions
References in periodicals archive ?
To support these results, there is a need for more comprehensive studies with the aim of assessing long term effects on patients, and understanding the relationships between viral load with intestinal permeability and systemic circulation disorders in chronic viral hepatitis patients.
Because lactulose molecules are large and are blocked from penetrating the intestinal wall in a healthy gut, a urine test result that shows high levels of lactulose indicates increased intestinal permeability. Mannitol molecules are smaller and easier to absorb; and low levels of mannitol in urine suggest poor absorption of small molecules.
Intestinal Permeability. From the graph shown in (Figure 4), the apparent permeability for both the pure drug and the SLN followed a similar pattern over time.
Altered expressions of ZO-1 and increased intestinal permeability have been observed in NAFLD patients [24].
An interplay between visceral adipose tissue, located close to the GI tract, and intestinal permeability has been demonstrated [13].
Multiple risk factors for exertional heatstroke, including hyperthermia, sleep deprivation, dehydration, and aging, have been shown to directly affect the integrity of the intestinal barrier and thus intestinal permeability (Figure 5).
In addition, higher levels of TNF-[alpha]lpha compared to control subjects were observed, although intestinal permeability and serum endotoxin levels were similar in the two groups [23].
It has low apparent intestinal permeability, and belongs to the class III of Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) [22-23].
However, she recommends the Intestinal Permeability Test, which shows if there is an association by measuring if two non-metabolized sugar molecules snuck through the lining.
The intestinal mucosa is the physical and metabolic barrier, regulated by an epithelial junctional complex referred to as the tight junction (TJ).[sup][4] This barrier function is reflected by the intestinal permeability. TJ is a cell-to-cell adhesion structure and plays a role in the barrier function.