interview

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in·ter·view

(in'tĕr-vyū),
Interpersonal meeting or consultation for the purpose of obtaining information.
[Fr. entrevue, fr. L. inter-, among, + video, to see]

Patient discussion about interview

Q. I need to do an interview with someone with knowledge on lupus for a research paper any takers? a couple of questions should do it. it doesn't have to be extensive.

A. I HAVE SLE AND A FUW MORE THANS THAT ARE KNOW TO BE KNOW TO COME FROM HAVEING SLE LUPUS I AM NOT 100% OF ALL THAT COMES WITH SLE BUT I AM WILLING TO TELL U ALL I KNOW THANK YOU

More discussions about interview
References in periodicals archive ?
It's also useful for companies to understand that interviewers may sometimes hire for themselves rather than what is the best company cultural fit or the applicant best qualified for the position.
Normally, in the West, a broadcaster asks to conduct an interview and issues the invitation with the name of the interviewer included.
Forensic interviewers are generally aware when this happens, but to some observers it is not obvious.
If the interviewer expected that half of the whole pool would be recommended, she would avoid recommending more than half of the applicants she interviewed in a given day.
The next time an interviewer sets you a philosophical conundrum more suited to a Buddhist monastery than a position in sales, treat them to the sound of one hand slapping.
The interviewer will want their doctor's name, address, telephone number and the dates of appointments, procedures or prescriptions.
This research began with the question as to why most managers who conduct employment interviews go untrained even though the benefits of training interviewers have been firmly established.
The goal of this question is usually two-fold; the interviewer wants to uncover any particular talents that you may have that the organization either doesn't have or could use more of.
You should be prepared to justify why the interviewer should hire you above all the other candidates.
In the second part of the paper, I show how the contextual pre-conditions of a political interview influence the choices made by an interviewer when he accuses a politician of an inconsistency and how a politician responds to the charge.
This gives the interviewer a better understanding of why you are right for the position.
Some organisations hold several job interviews with a few interviewers at a time while others have all the interviewers meeting candidates in one sitting, based on their resourcing policies and practice.