interview

(redirected from Interviewers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to Interviewers: Interviewees

in·ter·view

(in'tĕr-vyū),
Interpersonal meeting or consultation for the purpose of obtaining information.
[Fr. entrevue, fr. L. inter-, among, + video, to see]

interview

[in′tərvyo̅o̅]
a verbal interaction with a patient initiated for a specific purpose and focused on a specific content area. A problem-seeking interview is an inquiry that focuses on gathering data to identify problems the patient needs to resolve. A problem-solving interview focuses on problems that have been identified by the patient or health care professional.

Patient discussion about interview

Q. I need to do an interview with someone with knowledge on lupus for a research paper any takers? a couple of questions should do it. it doesn't have to be extensive.

A. I HAVE SLE AND A FUW MORE THANS THAT ARE KNOW TO BE KNOW TO COME FROM HAVEING SLE LUPUS I AM NOT 100% OF ALL THAT COMES WITH SLE BUT I AM WILLING TO TELL U ALL I KNOW THANK YOU

More discussions about interview
References in periodicals archive ?
10 However, even after the development of such objective assessment, the interviewer bias remains the focal point of discussion and evidence always emphasises on interviewers' training.
All the more reason to focus on the candidate's aspirations and what they see as their future to see if it matches up with the future an interviewer sees in the possible associate.
The reason for scripted sales interviews is that the interviewer doesn't have to be smart or creative or experienced.
Another no-no for interviewers is their tendency to talk more than their guests
Be sure to speak clearly and give the interviewer time to jot notes down.
At the start of each interview, the interviewers urged respondents to give honest responses.
Interviewers should examine the whole picture, including evidence, documents, and statements.
With email you can take your time to write a polite request for feedback, and the interviewer gets the chance to respond to it when it's convenient.
Showing the interviewer that you share similar values to them makes a good impression.
Rivera determined that three processes affect hiring in terms of cultural similarities: organisational processes (company cultural fit); cognitive processes (similarities meant interviewers understood better and gave higher merit to the candidates qualifications); and affective processes (similarities generated excitement about -- and support for -- the candidate.
The next day, Zarghami reportedly sent a letter to the supervisory board that oversees state broadcasting asking it to rule on how interviewers should be selected in the future.
At that point I, like other forensic interviewers, often find myself defending a child's calm demeanor, just as 1 do in court.