symbol

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symbol

 [sim´bol]
1. something, particularly an object, representing something else.
2. in psychoanalytic theory, a representation or perception that replaces unconscious mental content.
phallic symbol in psychoanalytic theory, any pointed or upright object which may represent the phallus or penis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sym·bol

(sim'bŏl),
1. A conventional sign serving as an abbreviation.
See also: conventional signs.
2. In chemistry, an abbreviation of the name of an element, radical, or compound, expressing in chemical formulas one atom or molecule of that element (for example, H and O in H2O); in biochemistry, an abbreviation of trivial names of molecules used primarily in combination with other similar symbols to construct larger assemblies (for example, Gly for glycine, Ado for adenosine, Glc for glucose).
See also: conventional signs.
3. In psychoanalysis, an object or action that is interpreted to represent some repressed or unconscious desire, often sexual.
See also: conventional signs.
4. A philosophical-linguistic sign.
See also: conventional signs.
[G. symbolon, a mark or sign, fr. sym-ballō, to throw together]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sym·bol

(sim'bŏl)
1. A conventional sign serving as an abbreviation.
2. In chemistry, an abbreviation of the name of an element, radical, or compound, expressing in chemical formulas one atom or molecule of that element (e.g., H and O in H2O).
3. In psychoanalysis, an object or action interpreted to represent some repressed or unconscious desire.
[G. symbolon, a mark or sign, fr. sym-ballō, to throw together]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sym·bol

(sim'bŏl)
1. A conventional sign serving as an abbreviation.
2. In chemistry, abbreviation of name of an element, radical, or compound.
[G. symbolon, a mark or sign, fr. sym-ballō, to throw together]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
He included many of these symbols, along with other international symbol systems, in his Handbook of Pictorial Symbols, published by Dover Books in 1976.
Despite this change of position, Modley believed that a new international symbol system would allow people to communicate across the many natural and human-made barriers that separate them.
An international symbol could increase public awareness of breastfeeding and provide an alternative image to the image of a baby bottle currently used to designate baby friendly areas in public.

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