internal mammary artery


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Related to internal mammary artery: Internal mammary vein, internal mammary artery bypass

in·ter·nal tho·rac·ic ar·ter·y

[TA]
origin, subclavian; branches, pericardiacophrenic, anterior intercostal, sternal, mediastinal, thymic, bronchial, muscular, and perforating branches, and bifurcates into the musculophrenic and superior epigastric.

internal mammary artery

Abbreviation: IMA
A branch of the subclavian artery that runs down the anterior wall of the thorax lateral to the sternum. Its branches include the anterior intercostal arteries, which supply blood to the anterior (sternal) segments of the upper nine intercostal spaces, and the musculophrenic arteries, which supply blood to the anterior (sternal) segments of intercostal spaces 7 to 11. The internal mammary artery continues in the abdominal wall as the superior epigastric artery. The left internal mammary artery (LIMA) is the artery most commonly used in coronary artery bypass graft surgery.
Synonym: internal thoracic artery
See also: artery
References in periodicals archive ?
Lightman, "CT diagnosis of internal mammary artery injury caused by blunt trauma," Clinical Radiology, vol.
A meta-analysis comparing bilateral internal mammary artery with left internal mammary artery for coronary artery bypass grafting.
Artery n-number of isolated cases Right intercostobronchial 157 (93) Right bronchial 45 (19) Left bronchial 55 (23) Common bronchial 97 (56) Right intercostal 36 (4) Left intercostal 28 (7) Right internal mammary artery 9 (1) Left internal mammary artery 23 (9) Right lateral thoracic 6 (0) Left lateral thoracic 16 (1) Right cervicothoracic 4 (1) Left cervicothoracic 10 (5) Right inferior phrenic 8 (4) Left inferior phrenic 1 (1) Artery with variant anatomy 5 (2) Anomalous artery 2 (2) Table 4: Comparison of outcome of bronchial artery embolization in various studies.
Should Bilateral Internal Mammary Artery Grafts Be Used For Coronary Artery Surgery?
The extrahepatic collateral vessels observed originated from the IPA, omental branch, adrenal artery, intercostal artery, cystic artery, internal mammary artery, renal or renal capsular artery, branch of the SMA, gastric artery, and lumbar artery.
Both internal mammary arteries were used in 9 patients, whereas only the left internal mammary artery was used in 18 patients and the right internal mammary artery in 1 patient.
Many interventional cardiologists have dismissed the results of BARI and other smaller studies favoring CABG as irrelevant in-the contemporary era of much-improved PCI techniques and drug-eluting stents, even though the current joint AHA/American College of Cardiology/Society for Coronary Angiography and Interventions guidelines state as a class IIa recommendation that "it is reasonable" to choose CABG with left internal mammary artery grafting over PCI in diabetic patients with multivessel disease.
Many interventional cardiologists have dismissed the results of BARI and other smaller studies favoring CABG as irrelevant in the contemporary era of much-improved PCI techniques and drug-eluting stents, even though the current joint AHA/American College of Cardiology/Society for Coronary Angiography and Interventions guidelines state as a class ha recommendation that "it is reasonable" to choose CABG with left internal mammary artery grafting over PCI in patients with diabetes and multivessel disease.
Sandeep has pioneered over 5500 multivessel CABG's (Coronary artery bypass), largely OP-CABG (Beating heart coronary artery bypass) using left ITA's (Internal mammary artery), free left and bilateral radial arteries, the use of a pedicled Rt GEPA (gastro epiploic artery as a vascular substitute for coronary artery bypass in over 50 cases), and over 150 reoperative CABG's (Redo heart surgery).
Coronary-subclavian steal syndrome (CSS) occurs when a patient with a history of left internal mammary artery coronary bypass surgery develops significant stenosis within the proximal left subclavian artery.
Primary risk factors for sternal complications include: high body mass index, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bilateral internal mammary artery grafting, diabetes mellitus, rethoracotomy, increased blood loss, higher disability classification, smoking, prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass and or surgical time, peripheral vascular disease, and female gender with large breast size.

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