internal jugular vein

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Related to Internal jugular veins: Brachiocephalic veins

in·ter·nal jug·u·lar vein

[TA]
main venous structure of the neck, formed as a continuation of the sigmoid sinus of the dura mater, contained within the carotid sheath as it descends the neck uniting, behind the sternoclavicular joint, with the subclavian vein to form the brachiocephalic vein.
Synonym(s): vena jugularis interna [TA]

in·ter·nal jug·u·lar vein

(in-tĕr'năl jŭg'yū-lăr vān) [TA]
Main venous structure of the neck, formed as a continuation of the sigmoid sinus of the dura mater, contained within the carotid sheath as it descends the neck to unite, behind the sternoclavicular joint, with the subclavian vein to form the brachiocephalic vein.

internal jugular vein

A large vein in the neck, it drains the skull, brain, and parts of the face and neck. It originates in the jugular foramen at the base of the skull and descends vertically (behind the sternocleidomastoid muscle) in the carotid sheath. At its base, the internal jugular vein merges with the subclavian vein behind the clavicle to form the brachiocephalic vein.

The internal jugular vein is forms in the base of the skull by the merger of the inferior petrosal and sigmoid sinuses. As the vein descends through the neck, tributary veins include the facial, lingual, pharyngeal, superior thyroid, and middle thyroid veins.

The right internal jugular vein is often the blood vessel used for medical access to the central venous circulation and to the right side of the heart.

See also: vein
References in periodicals archive ?
In cases with an infection involving posterior lateral pharyngeal space, the thrombosed internal jugular vein (IJV) may not be palpable [4].
It is characterized by (1) a history of recent oropharyngeal infection, (2) clinical or radiological evidence of internal jugular vein thrombosis (IJVT), and (3) isolation of a pathogen [3].
We therefore strongly believe that FHC placement should be reserved for patients in whom internal jugular vein catheterisation was unsuccessful or is contraindicated.
(1) We focused solely on JVR, a hemodynamic change in the internal jugular vein, without considering other intracranial venous abnormalities.
Hence, we designed our study to compare between landmark and ultrasound technique for the cannulation of right internal jugular vein with regard to safety, rapidity and feasibility.
Haacke, "A comparative study of magnetic resonance venography techniques for the evaluation of the internal jugular veins in multiple sclerosis patients," Magnetic Resonance Imaging, vol.
Duplication of the internal jugular vein (IJV) is very rare.
Lemierre syndrome or postanginal sepsis (necrobacillosis) is characterized by septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein (IJV) with frequent metastatic infections, usually due to anaerobic organisms.
c and d Left ICA angiography showing the high-grade stenosis (white arrow) and a direct carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) that drained into contralateral cavernous sinus via the intercavernous sinuses, and posteriorly into the internal jugular veins through the inferior petrosal sinuses.
For catheterization, decision for selecting subclavian, femoral or internal jugular vein was left to the operator.
Cerebral blood drains from the intracranial venous sinuses into the sigmoid sinuses before entering the internal jugular veins via the jugular foramina.[22] The bulbous dilatation of the jugular vein just below the base of the skull contains cerebral venous blood.[3] The jugular vein is usually the biggest vein in the neck.

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