internal jugular vein

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in·ter·nal jug·u·lar vein

[TA]
main venous structure of the neck, formed as a continuation of the sigmoid sinus of the dura mater, contained within the carotid sheath as it descends the neck uniting, behind the sternoclavicular joint, with the subclavian vein to form the brachiocephalic vein.
Synonym(s): vena jugularis interna [TA]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

in·ter·nal jug·u·lar vein

(in-tĕr'năl jŭg'yū-lăr vān) [TA]
Main venous structure of the neck, formed as a continuation of the sigmoid sinus of the dura mater, contained within the carotid sheath as it descends the neck to unite, behind the sternoclavicular joint, with the subclavian vein to form the brachiocephalic vein.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

internal jugular vein

A large vein in the neck, it drains the skull, brain, and parts of the face and neck. It originates in the jugular foramen at the base of the skull and descends vertically (behind the sternocleidomastoid muscle) in the carotid sheath. At its base, the internal jugular vein merges with the subclavian vein behind the clavicle to form the brachiocephalic vein.

The internal jugular vein is forms in the base of the skull by the merger of the inferior petrosal and sigmoid sinuses. As the vein descends through the neck, tributary veins include the facial, lingual, pharyngeal, superior thyroid, and middle thyroid veins.

The right internal jugular vein is often the blood vessel used for medical access to the central venous circulation and to the right side of the heart.

See also: vein
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
reported that the use of 2-dimensional US guidance was associated with increased success of cannulation of internal jugular vein and SCV [1].
An internal jugular venous aneurysm or pseudoaneurysm should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a pulsatile lateral neck mass.
Moreover, the majority of cases reported in the literature describe the catheter passing intravascular through the external or internal jugular vein.
Catheterization in the internal jugular vein was significantly related to infective endocarditis (pvalue: 0.015).
(b) Magnetic resonance angiography showing non-visualization of the transverse sinus, sigmoid sinus, and the internal jugular vein (red arrow).
Microvascular end-to-end anastomosis was performed in the left cervical region, to the superior thyroid artery, respectively to a branch of the internal jugular vein, under microscope magnification (Figure 8).
Catheterization sites other than the right internal jugular vein were at a higher risk for catheter misplacement.
Facial swelling on postoperative day 3 in a renal transplant recipient whose left internal jugular vein was cannulated at the time of transplant.

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