abdominal angina

(redirected from Intermittent Abdominal Pain)

ab·dom·i·nal an·gi·na

, angina abdominis
intermittent abdominal pain, frequently occurring at a fixed time after eating, caused by inadequacy of the mesenteric circulation resulting from arteriosclerosis or other arterial disease.
Synonym(s): intestinal angina

abdominal angina

n.
Intermittent abdominal pain, frequently occurring at a fixed time after eating, caused by inadequacy of the mesenteric circulation.
A condition characterised by intermittent severe ischaemia, resulting in abdominal colic, beginning 15–30 mins post-prandially, lasting 1–2 hours, and appearing when 2 or all 3—superior and inferior mesenteric and celiac—major abdominal arteries have severe atherosclerosis; because the intestine’s O2 demand increases with meals, patients avoid the pain by not eating, and thus lose weight; malabsorption may occur since absorption is O2-dependent
Management Bypass, endarterectomy, vascular reimplantation, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty

abdominal angina

Chronic mesenteric ischemia, see there.

ab·dom·i·nal an·gi·na

, angina abdominis (ab-dom'i-năl an'ji-nă, an'ji-nă ab-dō'mi-nis)
Intermittent abdominal pain, frequently occurring at a fixed time after eating, caused by inadequacy of the mesenteric circulation resulting from arteriosclerosis or other arterial disease, with associated significant weight loss.
Synonym(s): intestinal angina.

ab·dom·i·nal an·gi·na

, angina abdominis (ab-dom'i-năl an'ji-nă, an'ji-nă ab-dō'mi-nis)
Intermittent abdominal pain, frequently occurring at a fixed time after eating, caused by inadequate mesenteric circulation.
Synonym(s): intestinal angina.
References in periodicals archive ?
A 16-year-old male patient admitted to the pediatric emergency service with the complaint of intermittent abdominal pain and bilious vomiting.
Ileocolocolic intussusception secondary to a submucosal lipoma: an unusual cause of intermittent abdominal pain in a 62-year-old woman.
A 64-year-old woman with no significant medical history presented to the emergency department with worsening intermittent abdominal pain and chronic diarrhea, which had increased in frequency over the prior 3 months.
First patient was a 77 years-old-male with a 1-year history of JID that has caused long standing intermittent abdominal pain. He had several admissions previously due to increased severity of postprandial pain and due to weight loss attributed to his avoidance of eating.
Congenital anomalies of the pancreas must also be considered in terms of a differential diagnosis and this includes pancreatic divisum present in about 10% of population with the child having clinically intermittent abdominal pain and mild to severe recurrent episodes of pancreatitis.
Finally, her intermittent abdominal pain and bloody stools was improved after treatment and she was regular followed up was advised.
Mean duration of symptoms and the rate of right lower quadrant tenderness were higher, and abdominal pain was more likely to be continuous in Group A whereas intermittent abdominal pain was more common in Group NA (p=0.001).
He had been experiencing milder, intermittent abdominal pain for 2 months before.
She complained of progressive intermittent abdominal pain. Clinical exam revealed bilateral pitting edema and an elevated jugular venous pressure, with no history of familial polyposis or colorectal cancer.
Patients typically experience severe and intermittent abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and the inability to pass stool or flatus.
There were 53 cases with intermittent abdominal pain and 38 cases with persistent abdominal pain in non-hospitalization group, 70 cases with intermittent abdominal pain and 226 cases with persistent abdominal pain in hospitalization group, 20 cases with intermittent abdominal pain and 77 cases with persistent abdominal pain in emergency surgery group respectively.
The patient, a retired registered nurse, had a medical history of iron deficiency anemia, osteoporosis, vitamin D deficiency, recently diagnosed hypertension, and intermittent abdominal pain in the previous 6 months.