ceiling

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ceiling

Vox populi A maximum, upper limit. See Glass ceiling, Nondisclosure ceiling.
References in periodicals archive ?
Interest rate ceiling is a combination of fixed and floating interest rates.
Interest rate ceilings on loans, in the form of state-imposed usury laws, were widespread in the post-Depression period.
Results suggest accommodation by regulators in their approach to the setting of interest rate ceilings and floors and contradicts the conventional literature which posits that interest rate regulation impacts adversely on bank profitability.
Consequently, banks discovered they could obtain funds that were free from reserve requirements and simultaneously circumvent the Fed's Regulation Q interest rate ceilings by borrowing Eurodollars from their foreign branches.
In particular, the Depository Institutions Deregulation and Monetary Control Act (DIDMCA) of 1980, which mandates the gradual phaseout of the interest rate ceilings, and the Garn-St.
There are some other interest rate ceilings (on some types of credit and government-insured mortgages) still in force, but these are not serious interventions by the government [Cargill pp.
When the old interest rate ceilings were finally phased out in 1980, that at least helped commercial banks compete without having to offer us toasters in lieu of higher interest.
Interest rate ceilings limit how far lenders can raise loan rates to compensate for expected default losses but restrictions on collection remedies are generally associated with a higher interest rate.
The purpose was to allow banks and other financial institutions to conduct a deposit and loan business with foreign companies and individuals, including foreign banks, without being subject to reserve requirements or to the interest rate ceilings of the Federal Reserve Board.
However, this improved service may have resulted from the existence of interest rate ceilings on deposits that have caused banks to overinvest in real physical capital.