intentional tort

(redirected from Intentional torts)
Also found in: Legal.

intentional tort

An intentional wrongful act by a person or entity who means to cause harm, or who knows or is reasonably certain that harm will result from the act.
See also: tort
References in periodicals archive ?
But in a motion filed Friday, State Farm argues the new complaint contains only intentional torts, which the policy excludes.
While insurance is generally thought of as covering only harm that is fortuitous rather than intentionally caused by the insured, Coverage B, Personal Injury, of the CGL policy (and similar personal injury coverage in other policy forms) provides coverage for "offenses" that are intentional torts, including malicious prosecution.
Intentional torts are, quite simply, intentional acts by one person, and can go in both directions.
to come for Intentional Torts to Persons and Liability for Economic
Fifth, it proposes a new approach to analyzing jurisdiction by considering whether actors who commit intentional torts without a geographic focal point assume the risk of being sued wherever harm occurs.
1997) ("The inherent distinction between negligent and criminal, intentional torts is considerable, and we find it illogical and impractical for a fact-finder to have to compare or balance the two types of conduct.").
P&L Law can provide legal counsel for civil litigation cases that include auto accidents, shopping center accidents, medical malpractice, boating accidents, dog bites, wrongful death claims, battery, assault and intentional torts. Central Florida residents can also rely on P&L Law for business and commercial litigation that include disputes over lease agreements, real estate litigation, partnership dissolution, breach of contract disputes, employment agreement disputes, and shareholder agreement disputes.
Coverage then encompasses basic intentional torts, damages, statutes of limitations, and invasion of privacy.
First, "the requirement in negligence cases that the plaintiffs harm be an expectable or foreseeable consequence of the defendant's actions does not apply to intentional torts." (169) Second, courts express less concern about limiting a defendant's liability in situations where the defendant has acted with the requisite intent, which in many instances means that the defendant is considered to be morally blameworthy.
(64) Current tort claims can be understood as fitting within four categories: direct intentional torts, indirect intentional torts, direct unintentional torts, and indirect unintentional torts.
Andrich, (20) held that although the state's Comparative Negligence Act extends beyond ordinary negligence actions to include intentional torts, it does not apply to allow comparative fault apportionment of punitive damages for any type of act.
Before turning to the muddle of intention in contemporary tort law, I begin with how the law of bioethics came to be framed around intentional torts, specifically the tort of battery and lack of informed consent.