snow blindness

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blindness

 [blīnd´nes]
lack or loss of ability to see (see vision). Legally, blindness is defined as less than 20/200 vision in the better eye with glasses (vision of 20/200 is the ability to see at 20 feet only what the normal eye can see at 200 feet). A person with 20° or less vision (pinhole vision) is also legally blind. In 2002, the number of people classified as legally blind in the United States was estimated at 10 million; millions more had severe visual impairments. The five leading causes of impaired vision and blindness in the United States are age-related macular degeneration, cataract, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and atrophy of the optic nerve. Besides health care problems, issues related to employment, independent living, and literacy should all be considered when caring for patients who are blind. The American Foundation for the Blind is a resource center for information related to visual problems. They can be contacted by calling 1-800-232-5463 or consulting their web site at http://www.afb.org.
blue blindness (blue-yellow blindness) popular names for imperfect perception of blue and yellow tints; see tritanopia and tetartanopia.
color blindness color vision deficiency.
complete color blindness monochromatic vision.
day blindness hemeralopia.
green blindness imperfect perception of green tints; see deuteranopia and protanopia.
legal blindness that defined by law, usually, maximal visual acuity in the better eye after correction of 20/200 with a total diameter of the visual field in that eye of 20°.
night blindness see night blindness.
object blindness (psychic blindness) visual agnosia.
red blindness popular name for protanopia.
red-green blindness (red-green color blindness) popular names for any imperfect perception of red and green tints, including all the most common types of color vision deficiency. See deuteranomaly, deuteranopia, protanomaly, and protanopia.
snow blindness dimness of vision, usually temporary, due to the glare of the sun upon snow.
total color blindness monochromatic vision.
yellow blindness popular name for tritanopia.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

snow blind·ness

severe photophobia secondary to ultraviolet keratoconjunctivitis.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

snow blindness

n.
A usually temporary loss of vision and inflammation of the conjunctiva and cornea, caused by exposure of the eyes to bright sunlight and ultraviolet rays reflected from snow or ice.

snow′-blind′, snow′-blind′ed (-blīn′dĭd) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

snow blind·ness

(snō blīnd'nĕs)
Severe photophobia secondary to ultraviolet keratoconjunctivitis.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

snow blindness

The popular term for actinic keratopathy-damage to the outer layer of the corneas (the EPITHELIUM) from the effects of prolonged exposure to solar ultraviolet light. There is a temporary inability to keep the eyes open because the corneal nerves are painfully stimulated by the moving lids and there is tearing and BLEPHAROSPASM. If the eyes are kept shut the corneal epithelium regenerates in a day or two.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In the southern parts of the country, the challenges are high temperatures and intense sunlight, which can cause fruit to sunburn.
"India, being a tropical country, receives more than 12 hours of intense sunlight per day, which allows its nature to generate a huge amount of biomass," K.
The psychiatric disorder has been linked to a biochemical imbalance in the brain causing a person's biological internal clock and other 24-hour rhythms to become out of sync with the sun because of shorter days and less intense sunlight during the winter.
It also provides the perfect fill-in flash when photographing people in backlit conditions or under intense sunlight casting strong shadows on the face, ensuring your shots are perfectly lit.
Window film will also help protect soft furnishings which soon fade in intense sunlight. The softly smoky hues of regular window film are barely visible.
Standing tall: A man reacts to a shaft of intense sunlight reflected from the glass windows of the Walkie-Talkie tower in central London.
The Panasonic Toughpad tablets are engineered to not only withstand the hard knocks of life on the road, but to operate flawlessly in intense sunlight and heat, as well as in dusty and dirty environments, pouring rain and freezing temperatures.
A person with darker skin may move to regions with less intense sunlight, and those with less pigmentation may move to areas that are closer to the equator.
"A little bit of sunshine is a good thing, but the use of sunscreen to guard against skin cancer is important if you have more than 15 to 30 minutes of intense sunlight exposure," O'Keefe noted.
Well, I've been told it was caused by intense sunlight."
The warm/dry climate of Arizona is characterized by very intense sunlight, very high temperatures, reaching up to 46[degrees]C during the summer, minimal rain and very tow humidity.
African countries provide reliable levels of intense sunlight and operators everywhere have similar needs to reduce OPEX, improve uptime and be socially and environmentally sustainable."