snow blindness

(redirected from Intense sunlight)
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blindness

 [blīnd´nes]
lack or loss of ability to see (see vision). Legally, blindness is defined as less than 20/200 vision in the better eye with glasses (vision of 20/200 is the ability to see at 20 feet only what the normal eye can see at 200 feet). A person with 20° or less vision (pinhole vision) is also legally blind. In 2002, the number of people classified as legally blind in the United States was estimated at 10 million; millions more had severe visual impairments. The five leading causes of impaired vision and blindness in the United States are age-related macular degeneration, cataract, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and atrophy of the optic nerve. Besides health care problems, issues related to employment, independent living, and literacy should all be considered when caring for patients who are blind. The American Foundation for the Blind is a resource center for information related to visual problems. They can be contacted by calling 1-800-232-5463 or consulting their web site at http://www.afb.org.
blue blindness (blue-yellow blindness) popular names for imperfect perception of blue and yellow tints; see tritanopia and tetartanopia.
color blindness color vision deficiency.
complete color blindness monochromatic vision.
day blindness hemeralopia.
green blindness imperfect perception of green tints; see deuteranopia and protanopia.
legal blindness that defined by law, usually, maximal visual acuity in the better eye after correction of 20/200 with a total diameter of the visual field in that eye of 20°.
night blindness see night blindness.
object blindness (psychic blindness) visual agnosia.
red blindness popular name for protanopia.
red-green blindness (red-green color blindness) popular names for any imperfect perception of red and green tints, including all the most common types of color vision deficiency. See deuteranomaly, deuteranopia, protanomaly, and protanopia.
snow blindness dimness of vision, usually temporary, due to the glare of the sun upon snow.
total color blindness monochromatic vision.
yellow blindness popular name for tritanopia.

snow blind·ness

severe photophobia secondary to ultraviolet keratoconjunctivitis.

snow blindness

n.
A usually temporary loss of vision and inflammation of the conjunctiva and cornea, caused by exposure of the eyes to bright sunlight and ultraviolet rays reflected from snow or ice.

snow′-blind′, snow′-blind′ed (-blīn′dĭd) adj.

snow blindness

Etymology: AS, snaw + blind
a condition of photophobia, sometimes accompanied by keratitis or conjunctivitis, as a result of overexposure of the eyes to the glare of sun on snow.

snow blind·ness

(snō blīnd'nĕs)
Severe photophobia secondary to ultraviolet keratoconjunctivitis.

snow blindness

The popular term for actinic keratopathy-damage to the outer layer of the corneas (the EPITHELIUM) from the effects of prolonged exposure to solar ultraviolet light. There is a temporary inability to keep the eyes open because the corneal nerves are painfully stimulated by the moving lids and there is tearing and BLEPHAROSPASM. If the eyes are kept shut the corneal epithelium regenerates in a day or two.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the southern portion of the country, high temperatures and intense sunlight can cause fruit to burn.
Well, I've been told it was caused by intense sunlight.
The warm/dry climate of Arizona is characterized by very intense sunlight, very high temperatures, reaching up to 46[degrees]C during the summer, minimal rain and very tow humidity.
Contractors need adhesive sealants that will not require call backs, will not crack, sag, shrink, lose adhesion nor degrade due to intense sunlight or extreme weather conditions through the years; NOVAFLEX Metal Roof Sealant and Multi-Purpose Adhesive Sealant were designed to meet those high performance metal roof or general purpose building requirements.
African countries provide reliable levels of intense sunlight and operators everywhere have similar needs to reduce OPEX, improve uptime and be socially and environmentally sustainable.
A short period of exposure to intense sunlight (such as between 11 a.
The Sahara offers every advantage you want -- proximity to Europe, virtually no population and more intense sunlight," said George Joffe, a research fellow and Maghreb expert at Cambridge University, who is not affiliated to the plan.
During summer, the crosslinking process could be three to four times faster in areas of intense sunlight, such as the southern U.
Because those Symbiodinium are deficient in the photoprotection mechanisms described in the report, this may explain why deeper-water corals with nonclade A symbionts bleach more readily from the warmer-than-normal temperatures and intense sunlight conditions, typical in late-summer Caribbean waters.
Excess exposure to intense sunlight can burn the surface of the eye much like sunburn on the skin.
According to NASA it was not only Lulin's first visit to the inner solar system but also the green comet's first exposure to intense sunlight.